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Does anyone know if there will still be NSF postdocs offered (the current deadline is the 16th), given that the NSF website is currently down due to the government shutdown in the US?

Also, in case it is still open, if anyone has the PDFs that could previously be found at

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5301

regarding the information, application process, and forms to be submitted, perhaps they could mirror a copy on a website, and post the link here?

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  • This question is related to this post.
    – user4511
    Oct 4, 2013 at 17:07
  • I am wondering how it will affect current NSF postdocs. It is my understanding that current postdocs have their salary wired directly from the NSF (I believe in the past the funds used to be released to the university, which then released the salary). So I presume this means the nsf postdocs are not being paid during the shutdown?
    – user538
    Oct 10, 2013 at 15:27

2 Answers 2

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Documents are posted here. Extra text so I can actually post this.

I should note that some of the documents are specific to the Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, but some of them are general-purpose (I came to this question from MathOverflow).

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  • 2
    Excellent! I am sure you have helped many people by this. Oct 4, 2013 at 18:17
  • Could you please expand some of the text you link to? That would be useful the day the link is broken :)
    – user102
    Oct 5, 2013 at 12:55
  • @CharlesMorisset, sorry, I don't quite take your meaning, could you explain what you're asking me to do?
    – MTS
    Oct 6, 2013 at 4:49
  • @MTS: My bad, I thought you were replying to the main question, I didn't realise you were providing the link to the PDFS.
    – user102
    Oct 6, 2013 at 6:51
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I think the answer that we don't know. It depends on when and how the shutdown is resolved. As long as the NSF gets back up to its previous funding levels, presumably it should be OK. I think it's quite likely that the deadline will be pushed back given how close it is, but it's hard to know until something happens in Washington.

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