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In the past (historically), A+ was a bonus in transcript and had an effect on the cumulative GPA too, but it is no common these days (at least I do not see around). If some universities/colleges use A+ in the transcript, but it is equally considered as an A in calculating the GPA.

Is A+ obsolete in the US universities/colleges? or because they use it for rare occasions, we do not normally see it?

In other words, are there still universities using A+, and equaling it to 4.3 in calculating the GPA?

  • In undergrad chemistry, my professor emailed me after the course ended to say that "You have earned an A+, but [the automated grading system] does not accept anything higher than A". This A still translates to a 4.0, as does anything over 92%. 4.0 no longer means a perfect score. – J. Zimmerman Sep 13 '13 at 22:59
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    In the past...A+... had an effect on the cumulative GPA — [citation needed] – JeffE Sep 13 '13 at 22:59
  • @JeffE I have no solid reference for this. I just read/heard it long time ago. This is the reason that I asked this question. – Googlebot Sep 14 '13 at 0:30
  • @JeffE: University of Michigan does this. For example, see rackham.umich.edu/current-students/policies/gpa – Aditya Apr 30 '14 at 22:20
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How an A+ is treated varies from school to school. In the traditional American grading system, an "A" contributes a 4.0 to one's GPA, an "A-" contributes a 3.7, a "B+" contributes a 3.3, a "B" contributes 3.0, etc. In many universities, 4.0 represents the maximum possible GPA, and so an A+, although it may appear on the transcript next to a course, also only contributes 4.0 to one's GPA. At other universities (such as e.g. Columbia), an A+ contributes 4.3 to one's GPA.

None of this matters very much of course.

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    Except at large corporations, many of which still have GPA cutoffs for new hires. – aeismail Sep 14 '13 at 15:54
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    Minor point, at Columbia everything is taken to another decimal point. A+ is 4.33, A- is 3.66, etc. – chmullig Sep 16 '13 at 4:36
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I know that, out of top 20 schools, at least Stanford, Columbia, and Cornell give "bonus" credit for A+ (4.3). I'm sure many other schools do as well, though it is not really the norm.

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I think A+ is used, but not very often. For GPA purposes, A and A+ are usually equal, but A+ is a rarer grade. Sometimes, A+ is used for 96 and higher. Personally, 97 and higher would merit an A+ if I was doing the grading, but that's just my opinion.

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I am a student at State University of New York. For my first semester (I transferred from a community college) I got 4.03 GPA. I got three A's, one A-, and one A+.
So to answer your question: A+ is equaled to more than 4.0 GPA (I do not know if it is 4.3), it is rare and probably depends on your professor, but it is definitely not obsolete.

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    A+ grades are only available at some schools; neither of the institutions I attended used them. In fact, one didn't use pluses or minuses at all! – aeismail Sep 14 '13 at 15:55
  • @aeismail: I didn't say that they are available everywhere, just in my school. – user8607 Sep 14 '13 at 20:57
  • Actually, you didn't say that in your answer; you said it "depends on the professor," which suggests it's available at most (if not all) schools. – aeismail Sep 14 '13 at 21:35
  • @aeismail Heck, my graduate institution abandoned the "A, B...F" grading scale entirely. – Fomite Apr 30 '14 at 22:30
  • I have to say that 4.03 is an amusing GPA: though higher than a 4.0, it almost certainly denotes a worse performance. – Pete L. Clark Aug 14 '15 at 19:58
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I am a student at Arizona State University, I have a cumulative GPA of 4.0. However, my term GPA is 4.17 because I had an A and am A+! So, at ASU, if you got all A+'s you would have a Term GPA of 4.33, but probably still have a cumulative gpa of 4.0.

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At the University of Oregon, you can get an A+. Only some courses actually offer A+'s, however, if you do receive an A+, it counts as a 17.20 QP's and a 4.3 (instead of 4.0) towards your GPA.

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