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There are two terms in my thesis that I'm using throughout the entire work. They have been added to the glossary for that reason. However, by the time I got to chapter 4 or so I've stopped writing them as PDF hyperlinks (so that they can jump to the corresponding entry in the glossary) because I got really tired of it.

My assumption was that by this point the reader should know what the glossary terms mean.

Is this okay or should I use glossary hyperlinks as much as possible?

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    I did an index for one of my projects, and just used the edit / replace function... It raced through the text replacing that word with what was needed - I used tricks like having "ii" at the start of the word to identify them etc... Saved a huge amount of time compared to doing each one as they were being typed... – Solar Mike Dec 9 '18 at 15:39
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    Why don't you write a macro for the term with the hyperlink so that you don't have to rewrite the whole stuff every time? – Massimo Ortolano Dec 9 '18 at 16:06
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Actually, I question the value of hyperlinks at all. You are assuming that the reader will be using a specific technology to read, rather than just a printout.

It is really enough, in my opinion, to refer to the glossary at the first use of a term and forgo it thereafter. If the reader is aware that there is a glossary, they can go there in any case if they are puzzled.

The links will interrupt the flow of reading in any case. There is value in making the work beautiful, not just informative.

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  • This is especially true for terms that are used "throughout the entire work". – Alexis Dec 9 '18 at 20:50
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If your university has some thesis style guide / requirements, obviously follow them.

Your current approach does sound a little arbitrary, or even sloppy - like you ran out of time to make things uniform. If you had only linked the occurrence in the chapter defining the concept, that'd make more sense than linking every occurrence in chapters 1, 2, and 3. Linking every occurrence for a common word throughout the entire thesis seems ok, but maybe a little overzealous. After all, if I'm reading the PDF, presumably I can search myself. Another possibility would be to link the first occurrence in each chapter. This is useful for readers who don't follow your thesis from cover to cover.

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