1

I am Masters student in Mathematics.Currently I am studying modular forms.I am interested in integer partitions, Modular forms. I am working and thinking about problems which are arising during my studies.Besides this I am trying to understand connections of these problems to another field of Maths and physics. Actually I am preparing application for fellowship grant , there is requirement of Research statement.So How can I write down research statement having no strong result? Should false attempts during thinking about problems be included in resarch statement?

  • 2
    This had a downvote but I think there is a good question here about whether it is appropriate to include false starts/incorrect attempts at a problem on one's research statement. If you edit the question a bit and give the question title a more direct question then you might get good answers/discussion. – T_M Nov 9 '18 at 13:54
2

It is probably fine to indicate that you have already studied the problems/questions that you are exploring and that you have "narrowed the field" by rejecting certain unfruitful approaches. If you already have "strong results" then the research is behind you, not ahead. Focus more on the importance of the questions you are exploring than the failed attempts to answer them. In mathematics, some problems are inherently difficult. Some are even impossible, but things can be learned and math can advance even for those problems.

It is especially valuable, if true, to point out that some of the attempts to answer the main question have also raised new questions that are fruitful for exploration.

  • +1 for If you already have "strong results" then the research is behind you, not ahead. Indeed, this is especially true for mathematics, where research statements tend to be more a description of one's interests and one's studies related to that interest (such as independent study courses for credit, summer projects, honors thesis, etc.), all while trying to form a connection between this interest and that of some of the research carried out by members of the department to which one is applying. However, this is coming from a U.S. viewpoint . . . – Dave L Renfro Nov 9 '18 at 17:50

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.