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University retired researchers often get privileges to use Libraries etc. When a retired member uses the university library for research are they obliged to mention the university affiliation in subsequent publications?

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TL;DR. A retired member of staff should use any affiliation assigned by their previous employer. If no affiliation has been assigned, then they should ask their previous employer.


University retired researchers often get privileges to use Libraries etc.

Such privileges are presumably associated with a title: Universities generally control access to resources (such as libraries), hence, some form of access token is required and that token must be associated with an owner. The owner is typically affiliated with the university in some way, which merits a title. Some titles aren't sufficiently formal (e.g., graduand) to merit affiliation, others are.

When a retired member uses the university library for research are they obliged to mention the university affiliation in subsequent publications?

If the university has assigned the retired member a (sufficiently formal) title, then that title should be used. Otherwise, it is unclear whether the university considers the retired member to be affiliated with the university, hence, claiming affiliation would be misleading. I'd recommend asking the university in this case.

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    At my alma mater being a graduate is sufficient to have access to the library, but doesn't constitute an affiliation in the sense of the question, and I'm not sure that "B.A." is a title in the sense in which you're using the word. – Peter Taylor Oct 17 '18 at 11:25
  • @PeterTaylor Ultimately, if the library has an access control system, then its users most likely have titles. That's just how the technology is implemented. That title mightn't be public, indeed, it might only be known to some members of the IT team, but it most likely exists. In your case, it might simply be graduand, which clearly isn't the type of affiliation I was referring too. (Also, an alma mater is rather different from a previous employer, which what is under discussion.) – user2768 Oct 17 '18 at 11:48

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