4

About two years ago, I did a review for a journal (Engineering Failure Analysis, which is published by Elsevier). At that time my affiliation was different from today and I used my institutional email at that time to register as a reviewer in the Elsevier website. But right now that email is deleted and I don't have access to that email. I need to show somewhere that I did a review for this journal and they need some evidence. Despite, I have access to my account in Elsevier (The email is deleted but the account in Elsevier website remained unchanged and I have access to it), I can't find their acknowledgment email for my review. I asked their editorial office and their editor-in-chief 3 times and still after about 1 month I didn't get any answer yet. So, basically I want to know is it enough to take screen capture and show that I did the review to proof or not? Cause in some websites like Publons, it needs to send the confirmation email to their email server to be able to put it in your webpage and count it as a review, but I don't have that confirmation email and I don't think I could get that due to they're ignoring my emails. Any idea, suggestion, and recommendation is appreciated.

Also if somebody knows some sort of customer service or front desk information for Elsevier, I will appreciate if he/she could give it to me cause maybe it could be helpful to contact them directly. I searched a lot in their website but I didn't find anything about how to contact them.

  • 12
    I'm afraid what counts as proof depends on who is demanding the proof. – Alexander Woo Oct 9 '18 at 22:36
  • 2
    With security investigations and background checks, there’s no onus on you to prove your claims. The onus is entirely on NBIB to do a thorough investigation, and any details you provide beyond what is on the SF-86 are a voluntary disclosure that you are (legally) not obligated to provide. Of course, providing the information up front will accelerate the process and may reflect favorably on you (such as admitting to a history of drug use rather than hiding it). – Stella Biderman Oct 9 '18 at 23:33
  • 3
    @StellaBiderman I think the OP means they did the work of peer reviewing the paper, but advised the journal to reject it. – Alex Kruckman Oct 10 '18 at 1:33
  • 1
    @StellaBiderman I did the review but I advised the editor to reject it. As a result, my name is nowhere to be acknowledged. – Alone Programmer Oct 10 '18 at 2:36
  • 2
    In CS, it is common to acknowledge reviewers even for rejected papers by listing them in the front matter of the journal/proceedings. Presumably your review was anonymous to the authors, so even if the paper was accepted, you wouldn't find proof f your review in the paper. – JeffE Oct 10 '18 at 19:01
6

Ask the editorial office. You write that you've already asked them, but send them a reminder. Tell explicitly what you're looking for. In my experience for example, a letter saying you performed a review, on official Elsevier letterhead paper & with the desk editor's signature, suffices. This really should be something the journal office can do quickly. If they haven't responded my guess is that they're waiting for the editor-in-chief to respond, which is unnecessary.

| improve this answer | |
4

Much like during a background check, you can't provide more evidence than you have access to. (Well, you could, but it's generally frowned upon.) So send in what you have and let them judge it. Perhaps they don't consider it proof enough, which I assume means that you don't get credit for that one review, but no worse consequences than that.

| improve this answer | |
4

Check whether an issue of the journal lists you as a reviewer and if it does, then use that issue as evidence.

| improve this answer | |
  • I advised to reject that paper so that paper was not published to put my name as a reviewer in that issue. – Alone Programmer Oct 10 '18 at 14:30
  • 1
    Your recommendation doesn't matter: Many journals acknowledge reviewers (regardless of their recommendation---doing otherwise would be a little peculiar). When acceptance is recommended, the acknowledgement shouldn't appear in the same issue, since that would comprise anonymity. – user2768 Oct 10 '18 at 14:35
  • 2
    Good answer. See for example: esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ecy.2072 – Emilie Oct 10 '18 at 14:50
  • Unfortunately, this journal particularly in the Elsevier does not have any acknowledgment page for reviewers... – Alone Programmer Oct 10 '18 at 15:26
  • @AloneProgrammer Just to clarify, I mean an acknowledgements page in an issue of the journal, rather than a web page listing names. (The link provided by Emilie looks like it is a page from such an issue.) – user2768 Oct 10 '18 at 15:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.