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I have some rejections to my paper due to wrong selection of journals and the small mistakes done by me. The mistakes are so small for me but crucial to paper and can be fixed very quickly (less than a minute) by me. I want to improve paper by myself by taking a long time because no rejection yet happened due to some serious flaw that I cannot manage.

Since I am a beginner, can I use arXiv to improve my paper through feedbacks or by taking time to improve paper instead of sending to journals and getting rejections for small mistakes? Are there any drawbacks to put my paper in arXiv?

Points favor to me :

1) No time limit.

2) Feedbacks and suggestions may come.

3) Fewer chances for rejection if I publish it to a sensible journal after using arXiv.

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    There is nothing to stop you posting on arXiv, but you should not expect to get feedback when you post an article - you may get some feedback but it is unwise to rely on this. You should probably also bear in mind that an author of a mathematics paper should take responsibility for finding errors – Yemon Choi Aug 27 '18 at 4:04
  • When you say you are a "beginner", do you mean that you are a graduate student? undergraduate? doing maths in your spare time? – Yemon Choi Aug 27 '18 at 4:05
  • @YemonChoi Doing the math in spare time. I am not getting sufficient time to spend on paper. – hind Aug 27 '18 at 4:06
  • @YemonChoi I am a graduate student in CS but have ideas on mathematics. – hind Aug 27 '18 at 4:08
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    There is a potential negative: if you put incomplete, poorly written, or incorrect results on the arxiv, those who do look at them could stop taking you seriously, and even stop looking at your work. One has only so much time to scan the literature, and even less to look seriously at something. An author with a history of wasting one's time is an author whose work one usually chooses to ignore. – Dan Fox Aug 28 '18 at 13:19
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arXiv is not a good choice for obtaining feedback or informal reviews of papers.

arXiv is typically used for publishing pre-prints. It allows authors to disseminate a paper as well as enabling the paper to be cited in advance of traditional publishing. As such, it also allows authors to establish some claim of precedence on their work. Such papers are often published on arXiv with a note such as "Submitted for publication in < journal >" or "Accepted for publication in < journal >" since the publishing cycle can range from months to years in some fields.

I would venture that most readers will be other people working in the field, to see what work is currently being done. They are likely to have neither the time nor inclination to review and provide feedback on unpublished papers. It may vary depending on the field but I would expect that papers without an accompanying "Submitted ..." or "Accepted ..." note would have fewer reads, let alone feedback or responses.

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    "Submitted for publication in < journal >" is not a good idea. The paper might get declined, and then everyone (including the referee for the next journal you submit it to) gets to see that it's already been declined :) – darij grinberg Aug 27 '18 at 7:54

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