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I sent a research paper to one of the reputed journals through email to the editor.

I used the salutation Dear editor and didn't specify anything about my academic position either in email or in my research paper.

In response to my email, the editor replied to me as Dear professor. I am thinking whether to reply to the email again saying that I am not a professor or not to reply. Is it considerable? Since I am a beginner to this publication stuff, I can't figure out the etiquette of email.

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    When I was a PhD student, in the beginning I corrected editors "I don't have a Dr.-titel", but after a while I gave up, for it had no effect.
    – gerrit
    Aug 19, 2018 at 22:19
  • Time for a professional "footer" in your email correspondence? Although there is still a chance that this will be ignored, esp. if you don't mention any titles...
    – Gerhard
    Aug 20, 2018 at 5:30

3 Answers 3

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I don't think you need to send a correction immediately. The editor is most used to dealing with professors, it seems. However, in a future correspondence, you can add a note that you are not yet a professor or that you are studying for a degree, or something similar.

It isn't really a big concern, but you can easily make it a bit more explicit in the future.

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    The editor is playing safe: if you really were a professor, you might be offended if the editor addressed you as a mere Mr. On the same basis I have been addressed as "Your Excellency" when attending governmental conferences in foreign countries.
    – JeremyC
    Aug 19, 2018 at 21:29
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It's very common for editors and such people to address unknown researchers as "Professor" or "Dr" without checking that they actually hold such a position.

It doesn't mean anything; just ignore it. There is no point in replying.

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The editor has uptitled you to avoid the possibility of offence. There's absolutely no need to reply nor to ever correct the editor, that just causes the editor additional work.

Personally, I would never write Dear editor. I'd look-up the editor's name. If I knew them, then I'd just use their first name, otherwise, I'd look-up their title and use their title and family name.

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