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I recently found out that bioRxiv, the main biology preprint server, actually does not allow postprints to be submitted (even if allowed by the journal) according to its policy. This is in contrast to arXiv (after which biorxiv was modelled) which does allow submission of postprints.

To clarify, preprints are the authors' version of the paper prior to intial submission, and postprints are the authors' version of the paper which was accepted for publication (typically without the editing performed by the journal). The term "postprint" is a little confusing because the paper will often be accepted by the journal but not printed or released yet.

I can understand that these two types of manuscript are different and should probably be tagged differently, but I can't really see a significant benefit in not allowing postprint submission - after all they do provide access to otherwise paywalled information, often before it is actually published.

I would be interested to know if there are any alternatives to bioRxiv which allow postprint submission.

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Many of the OSF preprints are postprints. OSF is a platform that unites several preprint servers, and the posting rules may vary from one provider to the other. You can check it here: https://osf.io/preprints/ Also, I can suggest checking individual servers. You can find a comprehensive community-curated list here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17RgfuQcGJHKSsSJwZZn0oiXAnimZu2sZsWp8Z6ZaYYo/edit#gid=0

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In the U.S., everything funded by the NIH is available on PMC after 6 months: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ . It's not perfect, but it's a pretty good way to ensure accessibility.

  • Thanks. I am aware of this but unfortunately there are two problems it does not solve: (1) giving fast access to papers ; (2) postprints outside the US (thought there are some efforts to expand this ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/about/pmci). – Bitwise Aug 6 '18 at 7:29
  • EuropePMC? europepmc.org – rmounce Aug 14 '18 at 13:42
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In addition to Mariia Levchenko's answer (OSF Preprint servers).

Zenodo is an alternative server that is not solely restricted to biology subject-wise but does contain a lot of biology content. It accepts preprints, postprints, data, and software deposits. It is hosted at CERN so you can be confident of the sustainability of the service provided.

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