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A few months before, I have submitted a manuscript to an IEEE journal. But, unfortunately, it has been desk-rejected (because the manuscript is written like a report). The editor has mentioned in an email not to submit this manuscript again in the same journal.

However, I am planning to submit it again in the same IEEE journal because, I have made so much modifications and believe that this time the manuscript is up to the mark.

I have mentioned the above issue in the cover letter.

Is this a good idea? I mean does IEEE accept a previously rejected paper for publication? Because, the editor has explicitly stated not to submit the manuscript again. Does the editor consider the fact that we have modified the manuscript a lot?

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    I have submitted a manuscript to an IEEE journal Was it the first time you submitted the manuscript to that journal? – scaaahu Aug 2 '18 at 13:04
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    "The editor has mentioned not to submit this manuscript again in the same journal, however, I am planning to submit it again in the same journal." – Dirk Aug 2 '18 at 13:15
  • @scaaahu, yes. This time if I submit then it will be my second submission of the same manuscript. – user1838343 Aug 2 '18 at 13:16
  • @DirkLiebhold, because, I feel that I have changed the manuscript considerably. – user1838343 Aug 2 '18 at 13:18
  • @user1838343 so "you feel" - what do you think the editor will feel? – Solar Mike Aug 2 '18 at 13:21
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If it has sufficient changes and answers the concerns of the editor you will probably get a new hearing.

However, if you think of it as the same manuscript then perhaps you haven't made sufficient changes that it will be considers as new, rather than a resubmission.

However, if you have done the necessary work, I think your note accompanying the manuscript (NEW manuscript) should be sufficient. It is a courtesy to them so that they can be reminded of the history.

And of course, make sure it doesn't read like a "report". You may be able to get some local advice on that.

  • I agree with your main point here, but “if you think of it as the same manuscript then perhaps you haven't made sufficient changes” seems misleading to me. Even if I revise or expand a submission quite substantially, I’d still often think of it as (a revised version of) the same manuscript, unless I’ve literally scrapped the original and rewritten starting from a blank document. The relevant thing is not “do you feel this is the same manuscript?”, but “do you think you’ve revised it thoroughly enough to address the editor’s concerns?” – PLL Aug 2 '18 at 14:04
  • @PLL, no argument from me. It is just a psychological cue as to whether it is sufficiently different. A "wake up call" if you like. – Buffy Aug 2 '18 at 14:08

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