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I have written a letter of recommendation for a student who is applying to study abroad (we are in the USA, she is applying to study in Spain). The institution she is applying to requested that letters be submitted in Spanish; since I do not speak or write Spanish fluently, I asked a close friend (a native speaker of Spanish) to translate the letter for me.

My question is how to indicate this properly on the letter. My current plan is to add, just below my signature, the phrase "Traducido por ___________" and then the translator's name. Is that the right way to handle this, or is there something else I should be doing?

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  • No, just wondering if there is an established custom.
    – mweiss
    Jun 21 '18 at 3:05
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Since this is merely a letter and not a full-fledged thesis, it is fine to write it the way you have indicated in your question.

If the translator has notable credentials pertaining to Spanish (e.g., a degree in the language or some sort), perhaps you may consider adding that too, after the person's name.

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My current plan is to add, just below my signature, the phrase "Traducido por ___________" and then the translator's name. Is that the right way to handle this, or is there something else I should be doing?

That seems appropriate. You could also add it as a "PS: Traducido..." at the bottom.

Generally, it's not a bad idea to ask the translator. They may have experience with this sort of situation and be able to give more specific advice. Although in your situation, I suppose the translator is not actually a translator per se, and you are asking here, so...

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