3

We have our idea patented with the company we are working currently for. But, we have also been writing a paper draft on the theory and the mathematics behind the idea with practical results, plots, comments, and future directions. Can we submit the paper to arXiv linking it to the original patent? I am confused because arXiv is for open publishing but having the core idea patented doesn't, probably, allow open usage of the algorithm. Does it then contain the same academic value and worth putting on arXiv? Does arXiv allow such a thing at all? Thanks

  • I don't know one way or the other, but the third comment to Patent application file on arxiv looks like it's suggesting doing what you're asking about. – TripeHound Jun 12 '18 at 12:54
  • Just to be clear, you have the patent granted already? – Jon Custer Jun 12 '18 at 13:29
  • No. That's not yet patented. I was thinking of first patenting it and then publishing it on arXiv. But again I was concerned if it was at all ethical academically, and against arXiv's rules. – Vineeth Bhaskara Jun 12 '18 at 14:05
6

To the best of my knowledge, arXiv has no rules against posting preprints that discuss patented material. The only requirement is that you grant them a license in the copyright of the text you posted, so that they can distribute the article without having you sue them. They have no such strict "open publishing" rules as you suggest.

However, in many jurisdictions, if you publish your invention (i.e. make it public in any way) before applying for the patent (or maybe before having it granted?), your patent can be invalidated. Thus, you should consult with your patent attorney before publishing anything.

  • +1 The second part is important. Making public knowledge part or all of your invention can make it difficult to make claims during the patent process and even invalidate the patent due to lack of proprietary claims (you made them public knowledge). For European patents, the paradigm is first-to-file, which can be nightmarish if you divulge IP and plan to file in Europe (i.e. someone takes your idea in EU and files before you do, which is why companies file in parallel). And in parts of Asia, all a company needs is the IP and they can reproduce it without constraint or need for a patent. – CKM Jun 13 '18 at 1:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.