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I will be completing my MSc in mathematics, in India; and have before completed my PUC (11 & 12th classes) in PCMC (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science), and BSc in PCM (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics). In the MSc Math here in India, the courses are pre-fixed, and involves uniform concentration of all the math.

If I want to switch to doing research in physics, how difficult would it be? Is it harder to change fields at the stage of a PhD or a postdoc (or later)?

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    It depends very much on your physics background and your area of concentration in math. – physicss May 25 '18 at 18:50
  • Hi, thank you for the reply. I have completed my 11-12 in PCMC (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science) and my BSc in PCM (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics). In MSc Math, the courses are pre-fixed, and involves uniform concentration of all the math. – Immortal Player May 26 '18 at 6:06
  • Please edit this into your original question. – mas May 26 '18 at 8:47
  • @mas: Thank you for the reply. I have edited the question now. – Immortal Player May 26 '18 at 10:13
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    From your description (general math and physics knowledge but no specialization at all) you sound like you’re in the position of a typical physics undergrad but with better math foundations. So there should be no harm in switching. – knzhou May 26 '18 at 10:32
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What is the eligibility criteria for doing research in physics?

There are none.

If you want to get paid, again, there are no fixed criteria but you had best be more qualified than the other applicants for the job.

If I want to switch to doing research in physics, how difficult would it be?

You already studied a lot of physics plus some extra math. It should not be so hard. If you apply for PhD programs, you should clearly articulate why you are switching. Many people do PhDs in areas that include both physics and math - if you go that route it will be easier than if you try to so something purely experimental.

  • And would one with math msc and physics phd, be eligible to teach physics? – Immortal Player May 26 '18 at 11:32
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    Yes, and possibly math also. – Anonymous Physicist May 26 '18 at 11:36

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