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Last week, I did a computer lab for a class. At the end of the instructions was a script that would verify that everything in the lab was done correctly. At the end of the lab, I knew I had done everything correctly; however, the verification script wouldn't show that everything was done correctly.

The instructor didn't mention that some additional changes would have to be made to all the lab files for the verification script to pass. I found that out by going to the TAs. I have proof that the professor took notice of this error last week only after I had brought it up, and that I submitted the lab on the same day he did so - albeit a few hours later.

However, I forgot to make the necessary change for one of the lab files, for which I was docked 3 points (out of 20).

The professor has thus far refused to give me those points back. Assuming the evidence I have of the professor's oversight and of my same-day submission of the lab satisfies the standard of evidence at the department/university level for a grade dispute/appeal, should I appeal the grade or just let it go?

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    Can you make the case that you forgot to change because of their error? – Captain Emacs May 9 '18 at 17:59
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    @CaptainEmacs: I believe so, although the fact that I forgot regardless of the TA's instructions now creates doubt in my mind. – moonman239 May 9 '18 at 18:21
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    Your best strategy might be normally to operate by goodwill rather than demand, in this case. However, you seem to already have tried to fix it, so I see little chances to improve upon that, especially if the TA instructed you about what to do. – Captain Emacs May 9 '18 at 18:37
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    Just wanted to add a brief update - the professor received my phone call from this morning (just FYI, I'd also e-mailed him earlier in the week) and he said he would fix my grade. – moonman239 May 9 '18 at 22:19
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If you have already submitted the request for a regrade to the TA and instructor, then, for now, you've already done everything you can do at this time.

The real question here is how much this will matter at the end of the semester. Unless those points will take you across a "transition" point where the letter grade will change, it doesn't matter in the long run whether you get those points or not. So, ultimately, the need to fight for them depends on what weight those three points have. If the total basis is 1000 points, you're arguing about 0.3% of the total grade, and it's not likely to make a difference this year. But if it's 100 total, those 3 points become 3 percent of the total, and it's much more likely to matter.

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