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I don't know whether this question has been posted previously or not. I just successfully defended my PhD thesis and right now I am unofficially a PhD holder. I have applied to several institutions for postdoctoral research and so far I have been received two offers. One of the offers was from my current PhD supervisor and another one was from a reputable senior professor in my field. Although I really enjoyed working with my current supervisor, I don't think I have challenged myself enough in research. The research I conducted during my PhD study was a "safe" research and nothing groundbreaking was coming from it. My current supervisor is a nice professor who always listens to my problems, understands my plight as a researcher and always acts as a good boss to me. However, she's not a very good expert in my field and sometime she was clueless with what I was talking and she didn't encourage me to go for risky research during my PhD time. She also doesn't open to ideas of collaboration with experts from other countries as she likes to control everything. However, she has been a very pleasant person throughout my PhD journey.

On the other hand, another senior professor from other institution is a very respected professor from my field. He has a very big lab with many PhD students and postdoctoral researchers. However I have heard a lot of nasty things regarding his treatment to his students. I don't know whether I'll be ready to work with.

So right now I am in a dilemma to choose between these two as my postdoctoral supervisor. What should I do?

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    "My current supervisor is a nice professor who always listens to my problems, understands my plight as a researcher and always acts as a good boss to me." This is the same person as "supervisor continues to boss me around long after I left the university" academia.stackexchange.com/questions/97184/… ?? – Pete L. Clark Mar 15 '18 at 19:24
  • I have two supervisors: Main supervisor and co-supervisor. Both of them have exact equal powers against me – alex Mar 15 '18 at 19:35
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Have you been offered an interview with the other professor? If so, I would suggest going to this interview: interacting with this person directly will give you a more accurate sense of whether or not you want to work with them than things you "have heard" about them.

Attending an interview will in no way "lock you in" into accepting the position (you might not even be offered the position after the interview). I did turn down an offer after an interview, partly because I realized I couldn't have a healthy professional relationship with this PI, and partly because I wanted to do my postdoc abroad (this interview was in my home country).

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However I have heard a lot of nasty things regarding his treatment to his students.

If you think these rumors are true, do not go work for him. If you work for him, you are endorsing his behavior and his reputation will impact your reputation.

One of the offers was from my current PhD supervisor

There is a general expectation that a postdoctoral job should broaden your range of experience. If your postdoc supervisor is the same as your PhD supervisor, there will be a perception* that you did not acquire new skills. There may also be a perception that you did not move because you could not find a position that would broaden your skills. It also makes it look like your adviser could not help you find a job elsewhere.

In summary, I recommend you keep applying for postdoc positions. However, if you are one of the most famous institutions in your field, it would be acceptable to stay put, as relocation is less expected in this case.

*I do not endorse this view because it discriminates against people who are unable to move. But I think it is a widely held belief.

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