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I have been shortlisted for a job interview later this month for a lectureship in a UK university. The interview will consist of a presentation and a panel interview.

As per the HR's email, the presentation should talk about how I can contribute to the school's research, teaching and engagement. My question is, what to include in the teaching part? I will specify the school's existing modules that I can cover. Meanwhile, should I suggest one or two modules that I can develop but are not in the school's teaching portfolio yet? Or should I not include this in the presentation, but simply wait until the panel interview bring up this?

I'd like to show that I have done some research on the school's teaching programmes. But I don't want to sound like I am challenging the school's existing programmes. The job description does not mention the development of new modules, either.

Any comments and suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

  • Is it a "research intensive" (ie Russel Group) or one of the "1992" universities? – TheWanderer Mar 4 '18 at 13:44
  • It's a research intensive university. The presentation is 15 mins or so. I will focus more on the research part. As I don't have much experience in teaching, I'm concerned what I should talk about in regard to teaching. – K. Sugus Mar 4 '18 at 17:34
  • @K.Sugus they think about new subjects and relationship with already existing curriculum – SSimon Jun 13 '18 at 13:30
  • I took the liberty to modify the title as to make it more specific to your problem. – famargar Aug 30 '18 at 9:12
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Congratulations for getting an interview for a faculty position!

I'd like to show that I have done some research on the school's teaching programmes.

This should be highly appreciated. Interview panels are not only judging the quality of your research but also how well you would fit with them. They would be happy to know you have been looking into the details of how they operated the inner workings of their institution.

But I don't want to sound like I am challenging the school's existing programmes.

Agreed - you should't challenge the status quo - that is way too early for you to do so. Not because you are too junior to come up with good ideas! This is a general rule in joining a new organisation: you need first to the understand the decision making process and find the influential people that will help you implementing the changes you suggest if you want to succeed. What you can do is to hint (you have only few mins after all!) at how you can add value (value here means original contribution both in terms of ideas and skills) to the current curriculum

The job description does not mention the development of new modules, either.

That never really appears in job descriptions - and it's typically not in the panel's mind. That is why an original suggestion may be well appreciated - it shows you care about teaching, and you want to contribute there originally too. Only, try to do it in a way that shows a strong desire to contribute, rather than a willingness to disrupt.

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