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So, I have recently received a certificate of outstanding reviewer contribution from a good and well-known journal in my field. I admit that I did not even know these things exist until now.

Do these certificates carry any prestige? Does it makes any sense to include it on my CV? Or, equivalently, at what point does it make sense to include this achievement?

I expect that the less senior I am (i.e., PhD student) the more it matters, but what is the point that it becomes white noise on one's resume?

My initial thought is "NO" (in the sense that nobody in any hiring committee would care). On the other hand, given the constant struggle to find decent reviewers, maybe this carries some signal about my responsibilities towards the community. But I would like to see opinions in this matter, if any.

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    What do you mean by a junior non-tenured faculty member, currently submitting applications? Are you submitting your tenure packet? or are you planning to leave your current institution? Also, which country and field is this? – Thomas supports Monica Feb 10 '18 at 19:07
  • @Thomas I mean for both cases. Field is CS. Country should be irrelevant (i.e., application in multiple countries, mainly USA, France, UK) – PsySp Feb 10 '18 at 19:09
  • Well, I mentioned it on my full CV, but more because I was fed up by mentioning each year I have reviewed papers for the journal and notion like "2012-now" does not really quantify. I would reconsider if someone here convinces me. – Oleg Lobachev Feb 10 '18 at 19:20
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There is little significance, if any, attached to “good reviewer” commendations. You’re generally being hired for your research or teaching contributions, not service. The only thing that such an award shows is that you do make significant contributions in service, which demonstrates you might be a “good neighbor.” But that’s all that it shows, and not mentioning it will certainly not hurt you.

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    Agreed that the certificate per se is meaningless, but for a junior researcher it's still worth noting very briefly on one's CV that one does peer reviews for journals X, Y, and Z; perhaps under "Service" or something. It does indicate that you're respected enough in the field that your opinion has some value. – iayork Feb 13 '18 at 18:19

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