0

How can I transfer a mendeley database (including attached PDF files) from a computer to an another one which does not has access to the internet?

Thnaks

Edit:

This software requires log-in via your internet-based account in its first run, and as i found, it uses sqllite for database handling, and requires some tricks when moving the database from one computer to another. But, as you have logged-in, for next times there is no need to enter username & password.

closed as off-topic by Buzz, padawan, Stella Biderman, scaaahu, user3209815 Feb 7 '18 at 8:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Copy and paste? – user2768 Feb 6 '18 at 17:10
  • 1
    @user2768 This software requires log-in via your internet-based account in its first run, and as i found, it uses sqllite for database handling, and requires some trickes when moving the database from one computer to another. – Sd Hosseini Feb 6 '18 at 18:30
  • 1
    Details such as these are needed to answer the question, so maybe edit your question to include them. If "[the] software requires log-in via your internet-based account in its first run," then it is impossible to use the database on a computer without Internet access (because it cannot log-in, which is required during the first run). You could work around this, e.g., by connecting the computer to the Internet for the first run. But, we need to know your precise scenario. – user2768 Feb 6 '18 at 18:41
  • I've edited my answer in light of the changed question and voted to close as off topic because I think the edited question is off topic. – Stella Biderman Feb 6 '18 at 23:03
  • Is the content protected by DRM? I mean, stuff like this is technically possible, but is it legal? – Nat Feb 7 '18 at 1:51
1

Your best bet would probably be an external storage device such as these on Best Buy (not an endorsement of BestBuy, I just clicked the first online retailer link). However, you should be careful when doing this. If the computer in question isn't attached to the internet for security reasons, it might not be acceptable to plug an external storage device into it without special permission.

Edit: In response to your edit, if the software absolutely requires an internet connection, then it seems impossible. If there is a loophole, you should use the loophole. However, I don't know any loopholes in that particular program (as I have never heard of it before today), and I suspect asking for such a thing would be off-topic here.

0

Typically, if you want to download some sort of database that doesn't have an interface for it, then:

  1. You figure out how to do it manually.

  2. You write a script to automate the process.

For example, it's technically possible to write scripts that browse YouTube and download videos. A major question becomes if it's legal to do this.

So, the first step would seem to be to figure out if you're allowed to download the database. Then if so, you might do something like write a script that copies/parses the information and saves it to some convenient data structure. This may be a bit difficult to do if you're not already familiar with computer programming.

For an example, I've seen grad students automate some of their literature reading. They'd:

  1. Make a script that crawls Google Scholar, etc., for new related work.

  2. Have the script save a PDF and relevant meta-data for some viewer.

  3. Schedule the script to run regularly, e.g. daily.

    • The script's usually pretty fast, but if Google feels like you're abusing their service, they'll tend to start blocking your access.

    • I'm not familiar with the legality behind this practice and can't comment on if it might violate a Terms of Service (ToS).

  4. Provide some sort of notification to the user (e.g., via email or text) when new content's found.

Google Scholar might have some sort of API, but for quick scripts, it seems easier to write HTML-parsing logic since it's all highly structured to begin with, then just fix it when it breaks.

HTML's a nicer case, though, since it's parsable. If the viewer's closed-box, then you have to resort to parsing screenshots and simulating user interaction - which is entirely do-able, just more annoying to have to script.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.