3

I am a 46 year old former journalist who graduated with an Masters in Global Studies in 2008. After that, I decided to do a PhD, after working for an year. A dysfunctional program, personal issues, and lack of financial support all contributed to a delayed submission, this year in the summer. I have two masters, topped both of them, and published articles that have been widely cited, though they date before 2013. I have been too busy surviving after that. What can I do to maximize my chances of an academic career in Europe or North America? Is my age a crucial factor?

closed as off-topic by Buzz, scaaahu, user3209815, nengel, Stella Biderman Jan 30 '18 at 14:22

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The answer to this question strongly depends on individual factors such as a certain person’s preferences, a given institution’s regulations, the exact contents of your work or your personal values. Thus only someone familiar can answer this question and it cannot be generalised to apply to others. (See this discussion for more info.)" – Buzz, scaaahu, user3209815, nengel, Stella Biderman
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • There's a chance this will be closed as opinion-based. Could you rephrase so that the question focuses on something more operational and/or narrow? E.g. how can I maximize my chances for program X with my particular resumé? How important is age or time-to-submission? How important is a gap in publications? etc. (Some of these questions already have answers on this site.) – henning Jan 29 '18 at 18:08
3

My answer to this question of yours Does the time taken to do a PhD affect post doctoral applications? does also apply here: There is a chance, yes. How high that chance is depends on many factors. Your age, your publications, etc. are some of them, but others are for example the quality of your work, the availability of the position you are looking for, the energy you put into applying (e.g. do you contact every last university in all of North America and Europe?), what you want as a "career" - e.g. are you happy with a postdoc position that is not limited, or do you want to get to dean of the department before you hit 60 - etc.

So yes, there is a chance and yes, it is somewhat lowered by the points you gave. If you want to take it or not is your choice, no one else can make it for you.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.