37

I’m a student and I’ve been visiting a collaborator of my advisor to work on a project. The visiting period ends in a few days and it has been productive and enjoyable. We have worked well together, but the professor has no shortage of students or collaborators.

What is a more “refined and professional” way (for lack of a better term) to phrase the following message:

Keep me in the loop in case you have some other projects I may be able to contribute to.

  • 3
    You can weave it into a concise thank-you note. But most importantly say it to the professor face to face (both the thanks and the eagerness to come back in the future). Also, let your advisor at home know how well it went and how much you'd like to do it again in future. – aparente001 Jan 14 '18 at 18:12
  • 1
    Or just say it simple and straight ... I really enjoyed this project, would love to do it again if there is any possibility ... personally don't see reason to complicate or over-think it to much. – user85631 Jan 15 '18 at 12:51
  • Maybe it is just cultural, but I would say most of the answers here are informal, which to my mind is not what I would call professional and refined. Depends what you are looking for. – Sentinel Jan 16 '18 at 22:42
51

I really enjoy working with you. I hope you'll think of me if an opportunity arises where I might contribute to one of your projects.

  • Thank you. This is just the kind of phrasing I was looking for. – Dal Jan 14 '18 at 20:36
28

"Keep me in the loop" sounds fine to me. It's a pretty standard expression nowadays, and academia typically isn't hyper-formal anyway. I would just add "please".

  • 1
    Thanks for your answer. I actually wasn't questioning the idiom, but the whole message, which I'm afraid may give the "cold call" vibe. – Dal Jan 14 '18 at 17:17
11

I really loved working with you. It has been very productive for me. I would love to be able to do it again. Thank you.

You are this way letting him/her know how much you liked working together, you valued it (it was productive) and you would love to do it again. You are not asking for anything. You are not saying "keep me in the loop" that puts the burden on him/her, or anything like that ("let me know ...", "think of me ...", etc.)

You are making your point clear, no need to say anything else, and no pressure whatsoever on him/her.

  • 1
    That's a thank you note, which doesn't seem to address the OP's question. – user2768 Jan 15 '18 at 10:24
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    If you read the whole answer, it is exactly an answer to the OP's question – user Jan 15 '18 at 22:09
  • I have read the whole answer. You answer your own question, rather than the one asked by the OP. I appreciate that you might believe the OP has asked the wrong question, but I disagree: I believe a valid question has been asked. – user2768 Jan 16 '18 at 10:04
  • @user2768 I never said the OP has asked the wrong question, but you can believe what you like. – user Jan 17 '18 at 12:07
  • I never said that "[you] said the OP has asked the wrong question." I did say that you've answered your own question. In particular, the OP questions how to phrase a "keep me in the loop" message and you dismiss this when you write: "You are not saying 'keep me in the loop'..." Perhaps you can clarify how your answer relates to the OP's question? – user2768 Jan 17 '18 at 12:53
4

TL;DR

I really enjoy working with you and if possible I would appreciate the chance to contribute to one of your future projects. Would you mind if we stay in contact?

(The answer might be Influenced by culture and heavily depending on the hierarchy of your field.)

If I would receive a letter (or similar) containing a statement like:

I really enjoy working with you. I hope you'll think of me if an opportunity arises where I might contribute to one of your projects.

I would immediately wonder why you plan to maintain a passive role in this (as I stated before might be cultural), since it essentially puts multiple burden on me:

  1. I need to keep you in mind (besides all the other stuff)
  2. I need to judge whether certain topics would fit.
  3. I need to initiate the conversation.

Why don’t you assume a more active role in this interaction.

Not being a native (English) speaker, I am not sure how to phrase it properly (please edit in case).

I would love to read something like the following:

I really enjoy working with you and if possible I would appreciate the chance to contribute to one of your future projects. Would you mind if we stay in contact?

  • I see your point, but "keep me in the loop" means "please contact me", not "may I contact you?". – henning Jan 15 '18 at 9:45
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    Right...hm...I guess I did not make myself clear enough than. My point is that I think it would be more professional not to ask to be kept in the loop, but to take action rather than waiting to be contacted and by this defer the responsibility. – rul30 Jan 15 '18 at 9:51
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    I'm not sure about what you are suggesting: 1) call him periodically and basically say "what do you have for me today?" 2) contact him if I want to pick his brain about my own ongoing work. I'm surely going to do (2), but I think (1) is a bit unprofessional, although it surely is more pushy (and possibly effective) than "I really enjoy working with you. I hope you'll think of me if an opportunity arises where I might contribute to one of your projects." – Dal Jan 15 '18 at 13:41
  • You are right @Dal; 1) is currently pushy (that’s why I requested a native speaker to edit it) but it also would show pro-active effort. I’ll try to edit – rul30 Jan 15 '18 at 17:12
1

I would like to work with you again. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you see an opportunity for our further cooperation..

  • The OP is a student. He wants to contribute to other project the professor has. I can hardly call it "cooperation". – scaaahu Feb 22 '18 at 12:42
1

As noted by aparente001 and discussed by others:

You can weave ["Keep me in the loop"] into a concise thank-you note.

But, keep me in the loop is rather vague and leaves your collaborators unsure of what you are offering. Be more precise: mention what you're willing to contribute. E.g., additional experiments, writing-up, proofreading, ...


The OP commented:

I actually wasn't questioning the ["Keep me in the loop"] idiom, but the whole message, which I'm afraid may give the "cold call" vibe.

I'm uncertain what the "cold call" vibe is, I think you mean: "Keep me in the loop" lacks sincerity. My answer is intended to address that.

protected by ff524 Jan 15 '18 at 15:10

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