1

Is it allowed for people to obtain multiple PhDs at different stages of their career? I am thinking of Phys and Bio. Then regardless of that, is it allowed to teach in different departments at one or multiple institutions. (But I would want a tenured-position somewhere.) By teaching, I also wish to include doing relevant research in the two different fields. (for me, maybe physics and biology. Beware: Not biophys.)

John

5

There is, in general, no prohibition on getting multiple PhDs.* However, it is usually not recommended. This topic is covered in another questions on this site, e.g., When does one go for a double doctorate?

Teaching in multiple departments at a university is unrelated to having multiple PhDs. Usually someone who teaches in two departments effectively teaches "one thing" that is relevant to both departments, rather than teaching two unrelated things. For example, someone who specializes in internet law is likely to be associated with both the law and computer science departments.

*Although some universities/departments won't let you join their PhD program if you already have a PhD

  • Thanks for the suggestion!!By teaching, I also wish to include doing relevant research in the two different fields. (for me, maybe physics and biology. Beware: Not biophys.) – John Dec 5 '17 at 23:41
  • 2
    @user510607 There is nothing stopping you doing research in as many fields as you want. Except, maybe, time and money. – Mark Dec 6 '17 at 2:01
  • 1
    @John - perhaps you have a very narrow view of what biophysics is or is not. It started with a bunch of folks who wanted to bring a little physics perspectives to biology, or a little biology perspectives to physics. Interdisciplinary fields are not rigorously defined. – Jon Custer Dec 6 '17 at 14:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.