2 typos
source | link

Have previous test(s) results as a proof of fairness of your grading

First-hand experience: I went to a very selective college, they intentionally do not use "gaussian grading" on the behalf (which I fully share) that, since they are preparing students for the outside world/for higher academical achievements, it is not fair for individual scores to be influenced by how "good" the other classmates are, since a "class", for how big it may be, it is just not a representative sample of all the students in the field.

In a course full of talented students it is fair that there will be a lot of "A", in a less gifted/less previously prepared class it is absolutely ok that most of them will have positive but not so great grades.

AIn a course that I followed the group was less than excellent, as a result the negative results on finals (we have no mid-semester assignements or whatsoever) were over 70% of the total.

When challenged by a few students the professor simply showed to the board that the exams were really similar to those from past years, the material provided the same and the only real difference was, well, in the results. End of the thing.

What you need to do, if challenged, is the exact same thing (albeit with opposite data). This way you will show that you simply encountered a very good group of students and are giving them the high scores they deserve.

There is no point in lowering grades of very good students because they happened to be in the company of other great individuals, and the opposite applies too. It leads to questions like "Yes, X has good grades, but was he a good student or just happened that the other ~40 people he was in class with were just not that brilliant?"

EDIT: I feel adding my comment to another answer as part of this answer.

In my graduating group there was an abnormally large amount of great students who went on to purse phds or got into great companies, both with excellent results. There were a LOT of top marks in a lot of tests. It would have been very unfair if tests were made harder to have the grades fit a gaussian and thus have way less excellent students who happened to be in other "less gifted" groups get higher grades and get ahead of them when competing for doc.s, positions in r&d etc. The assumption that a group of ~50 people should fit the general normal distribution for whole field is a HUGE one

Have previous test(s) results as a proof of fairness of your grading

First-hand experience: I went to a very selective college, they intentionally do not use "gaussian grading" on the behalf (which I fully share) that, since they are preparing students for the outside world/for higher academical achievements, it is not fair for individual scores to be influenced by how "good" the other classmates are, since a "class", for how big it may be, it is just not a representative sample of all the students in the field.

In a course full of talented students it is fair that there will be a lot of "A", in a less gifted/less previously prepared class it is absolutely ok that most of them will have positive but not so great grades.

A course that I followed the group was less than excellent, as a result the negative results on finals (we have no mid-semester assignements or whatsoever) were over 70% of the total.

When challenged by a few students the professor simply showed to the board that the exams were really similar to those from past years, the material provided the same and the only real difference was, well, in the results. End of the thing.

What you need to do, if challenged, is the exact same thing (albeit with opposite data). This way you will show that you simply encountered a very good group of students and are giving them the high scores they deserve.

Have previous test(s) results as a proof of fairness of your grading

First-hand experience: I went to a very selective college, they intentionally do not use "gaussian grading" on the behalf (which I fully share) that, since they are preparing students for the outside world/for higher academical achievements, it is not fair for individual scores to be influenced by how "good" the other classmates are, since a "class", for how big it may be, it is just not a representative sample of all the students in the field.

In a course full of talented students it is fair that there will be a lot of "A", in a less gifted/less previously prepared class it is absolutely ok that most of them will have positive but not so great grades.

In a course that I followed the group was less than excellent, as a result the negative results on finals (we have no mid-semester assignements or whatsoever) were over 70% of the total.

When challenged by a few students the professor simply showed to the board that the exams were really similar to those from past years, the material provided the same and the only real difference was, well, in the results. End of the thing.

What you need to do, if challenged, is the exact same thing (albeit with opposite data). This way you will show that you simply encountered a very good group of students and are giving them the high scores they deserve.

There is no point in lowering grades of very good students because they happened to be in the company of other great individuals, and the opposite applies too. It leads to questions like "Yes, X has good grades, but was he a good student or just happened that the other ~40 people he was in class with were just not that brilliant?"

EDIT: I feel adding my comment to another answer as part of this answer.

In my graduating group there was an abnormally large amount of great students who went on to purse phds or got into great companies, both with excellent results. There were a LOT of top marks in a lot of tests. It would have been very unfair if tests were made harder to have the grades fit a gaussian and thus have way less excellent students who happened to be in other "less gifted" groups get higher grades and get ahead of them when competing for doc.s, positions in r&d etc. The assumption that a group of ~50 people should fit the general normal distribution for whole field is a HUGE one

1
source | link

Have previous test(s) results as a proof of fairness of your grading

First-hand experience: I went to a very selective college, they intentionally do not use "gaussian grading" on the behalf (which I fully share) that, since they are preparing students for the outside world/for higher academical achievements, it is not fair for individual scores to be influenced by how "good" the other classmates are, since a "class", for how big it may be, it is just not a representative sample of all the students in the field.

In a course full of talented students it is fair that there will be a lot of "A", in a less gifted/less previously prepared class it is absolutely ok that most of them will have positive but not so great grades.

A course that I followed the group was less than excellent, as a result the negative results on finals (we have no mid-semester assignements or whatsoever) were over 70% of the total.

When challenged by a few students the professor simply showed to the board that the exams were really similar to those from past years, the material provided the same and the only real difference was, well, in the results. End of the thing.

What you need to do, if challenged, is the exact same thing (albeit with opposite data). This way you will show that you simply encountered a very good group of students and are giving them the high scores they deserve.