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I tend to agree with @Arno's answer that citing non-English sources is fine. But that is actually beside the point, since as far as OP's situation is concerned, I think he has much less of a dilemma than he thinks.

The reason is that whether to publish a paper that references many German-language sources should be an editorial decision. As a reviewer, OP should check that the paper is correct (including looking up the references to the extent that's necessary, which OP can do since he speaks German), and that it is novel and lives up to the standards of the journal. If those conditions hold, he should recommend acceptance. He can also point out in his report the potential issue with non-German readers not being able to fully understand the theoretical background the paper makes use of. It would then be up to the editor to decide how to handle the situation, depending on their philosophy and the policies of the journal (which may vary, for example a journal published in Germany might have a different view of such issues than one published in the United States).

To summarize, the question of whether papers like this should be published is a very interesting one, but from a practical point of view, I don't think OP really needs to concern himself with it.

I tend to agree with @Arno's answer that citing non-English sources is fine. But that is actually beside the point, since as far as OP's situation is concerned, I think he has much less of a dilemma than he thinks.

The reason is that whether to publish a paper that references many German-language sources should be an editorial decision. As a reviewer, OP should check that the paper is correct (including looking up the references to the extent that's necessary, which OP can do since he speaks German), and that it is novel and lives up to the standards of the journal. If those conditions hold, he should recommend acceptance. He can also point out in his report the potential issue with non-German readers not being able to fully understand the theoretical background the paper makes use of. It would then be up to the editor to decide how to handle the situation, depending on their philosophy and the policies of the journal (which may vary, for example a journal published in Germany might have a different view of such issues than one published in the United States).

To summarize, the question of papers like this should be published is a very interesting one, but from a practical point of view, I don't think OP really needs to concern himself with it.

I tend to agree with @Arno's answer that citing non-English sources is fine. But that is actually beside the point, since as far as OP's situation is concerned, I think he has much less of a dilemma than he thinks.

The reason is that whether to publish a paper that references many German-language sources should be an editorial decision. As a reviewer, OP should check that the paper is correct (including looking up the references to the extent that's necessary, which OP can do since he speaks German), and that it is novel and lives up to the standards of the journal. If those conditions hold, he should recommend acceptance. He can also point out in his report the potential issue with non-German readers not being able to fully understand the theoretical background the paper makes use of. It would then be up to the editor to decide how to handle the situation, depending on their philosophy and the policies of the journal (which may vary, for example a journal published in Germany might have a different view of such issues than one published in the United States).

To summarize, the question of whether papers like this should be published is a very interesting one, but from a practical point of view, I don't think OP really needs to concern himself with it.

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source | link

I tend to agree with @Arno's answer that citing non-English sources is fine. But that is actually beside the point, since as far as OP's situation is concerned, I think he has much less of a dilemma than he thinks.

The reason is that whether to publish a paper that references many German-language sources should be an editorial decision. As a reviewer, OP should check that the paper is correct (including looking up the references to the extent that's necessary, which OP can do since he speaks German), and that it is novel and lives up to the standards of the journal. If those conditions hold, he should recommend acceptance. He can also point out in his report the potential issue with non-German readers not being able to fully understand the theoretical background the paper makes use of. It would then be up to the editor to decide how to handle the situation, depending on their philosophy and the policies of the journal (which may vary, for example a journal published in Germany might have a different view of such issues than one published in the United States).

To summarize, the question of papers like this should be published is a very interesting one, but from a practical point of view, I don't think OP really needs to concern himself with it.