2 Additional idea supporting my argument.
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I was the first PhD my advisor had produced; and I could not have had a better experience. My only warning would be to make sure your younger professor has published in journals where you would like to publish, too, and preferably more than just one or two papers. Experience in writing for those journals is something you want, because typically you need to publish a few papers to prove elements of your dissertation are actually "an original contribution". At least that is how it was judged at the two universities I attended; just a PhD committee's agreement that it was original and a worthy contribution was not considered sufficient; acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal was the criterion.

Anyway, a younger professor with no PhD graduates yet will pay more attention to you, and may be close to your age (within 10 years) so treat you less dismissively than the older professors, and in my experience may have more energy, working more hours, and be more available to you than older professors. I was able to discuss my project with my advisor nearly every day, probably 4 out of 5 weekdays. I know other candidates that went much longer than that. I know one candidate that chose the department head as his advisor, and got one hour a MONTH with him, and after a year of that worked up the courage (or enough frustration) to switch to a new advisor and started all over with different research. Mostly wasted a whole year.  

Added: It can also be true for a young professor seeking tenure that successfully graduating a PhD is a plus mark for his tenure case, in 3 or 5 years. Unlike a tenured older professor, this is another incentive for the younger professor to pay attention to your progress and keep you on track.

I was the first PhD my advisor had produced; and I could not have had a better experience. My only warning would be to make sure your younger professor has published in journals where you would like to publish, too, and preferably more than just one or two papers. Experience in writing for those journals is something you want, because typically you need to publish a few papers to prove elements of your dissertation are actually "an original contribution". At least that is how it was judged at the two universities I attended; just a PhD committee's agreement that it was original and a worthy contribution was not considered sufficient; acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal was the criterion.

Anyway, a younger professor with no PhD graduates yet will pay more attention to you, and may be close to your age (within 10 years) so treat you less dismissively than the older professors, and in my experience may have more energy, working more hours, and be more available to you than older professors. I was able to discuss my project with my advisor nearly every day, probably 4 out of 5 weekdays. I know other candidates that went much longer than that. I know one candidate that chose the department head as his advisor, and got one hour a MONTH with him, and after a year of that worked up the courage (or enough frustration) to switch to a new advisor and started all over with different research. Mostly wasted a whole year.  

I was the first PhD my advisor had produced; and I could not have had a better experience. My only warning would be to make sure your younger professor has published in journals where you would like to publish, too, and preferably more than just one or two papers. Experience in writing for those journals is something you want, because typically you need to publish a few papers to prove elements of your dissertation are actually "an original contribution". At least that is how it was judged at the two universities I attended; just a PhD committee's agreement that it was original and a worthy contribution was not considered sufficient; acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal was the criterion.

Anyway, a younger professor with no PhD graduates yet will pay more attention to you, and may be close to your age (within 10 years) so treat you less dismissively than the older professors, and in my experience may have more energy, working more hours, and be more available to you than older professors. I was able to discuss my project with my advisor nearly every day, probably 4 out of 5 weekdays. I know other candidates that went much longer than that. I know one candidate that chose the department head as his advisor, and got one hour a MONTH with him, and after a year of that worked up the courage (or enough frustration) to switch to a new advisor and started all over with different research. Mostly wasted a whole year.

Added: It can also be true for a young professor seeking tenure that successfully graduating a PhD is a plus mark for his tenure case, in 3 or 5 years. Unlike a tenured older professor, this is another incentive for the younger professor to pay attention to your progress and keep you on track.

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I was the first PhD my advisor had produced; and I could not have had a better experience. My only warning would be to make sure your younger professor has published in journals where you would like to publish, too, and preferably more than just one or two papers. Experience in writing for those journals is something you want, because typically you need to publish a few papers to prove elements of your dissertation are actually "an original contribution". At least that is how it was judged at the two universities I attended; just a PhD committee's agreement that it was original and a worthy contribution was not considered sufficient; acceptance in a peer-reviewed journal was the criterion.

Anyway, a younger professor with no PhD graduates yet will pay more attention to you, and may be close to your age (within 10 years) so treat you less dismissively than the older professors, and in my experience may have more energy, working more hours, and be more available to you than older professors. I was able to discuss my project with my advisor nearly every day, probably 4 out of 5 weekdays. I know other candidates that went much longer than that. I know one candidate that chose the department head as his advisor, and got one hour a MONTH with him, and after a year of that worked up the courage (or enough frustration) to switch to a new advisor and started all over with different research. Mostly wasted a whole year.