9 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tchaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

If you really feel that academic honesty requires you to list the paper as G. Smith in the bibliography, then depending on the reference style the journal requires, you could use

M. Smith [G. Smith 2016] showed that ...

or

M. Smith [6] showed that ...
References
[6] G. Smith, "paper title" ...

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tchaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tchaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

If you really feel that academic honesty requires you to list the paper as G. Smith in the bibliography, then depending on the reference style the journal requires, you could use

M. Smith [G. Smith 2016] showed that ...

or

M. Smith [6] showed that ...
References
[6] G. Smith, "paper title" ...

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

8 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name TschaikovskyTchaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tschaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tchaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

7 changed "her" to "his"
source | link

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tschaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all herhis papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tschaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all her papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed.

A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he started publishing in English all have the name Tschaikovsky. Would you really want to list half his papers under one name and half under the other? That really would be confusing, especially since the two names are quite far apart alphabetically.

What people sometimes do in this instance is list all his papers under the new name. Sometimes they put something like (pubished as Chaikovskii) in the reference and sometimes they don't.

I don't really see why we should treat transgender people worse than Russians.

I would recommend people do the same thing in this case. List all the papers in the bibliography with her new name. Add (published as G. Smith) if you feel people will be confused by the change of initials. When your colleague becomes world-famous and has many publications under the name M. Smith, then G. Smith will be the confusing citation.

About the name change causing confusion: a very famous computer scientist insists on listing everybody in his bibliographies with their full names (Xavier Yawkey Zacharias Jones), even if they put just Z. Jones on all their publications. This has not caused widespread confusion.

6 deleted 13 characters in body
source | link
5 edited body
source | link
4 added 9 characters in body
source | link
3 added 9 characters in body
source | link
2 added 61 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link