Does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbidsforbid the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

I was reading the "Your Guide to Publishing Publishing Open Access with with Elsevier" (URL: https://www.elsevier.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/181433/openaccessbooklet_May.pdf (mirror)) and saw this table on page 6:

enter image description hereTable describing permissions granted by various licences

Why does the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license in this Elsevier onlyonly allow "Text & data data mine"min[ing]" for private use use only and and not for distribution distribution? I understand one cannot make a commercial use of it but does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbidsforbid the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

ND (NoDerivatives) is described by creativecommons.org described by creativecommons.org asas follows:

If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

it'sIt's not obvious to me that the output of a text mining or data mining program necessarily qualifies as a derivative.

Does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbids the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such license?

I was reading the "Your Guide to Publishing Open Access with Elsevier" (URL: https://www.elsevier.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/181433/openaccessbooklet_May.pdf (mirror)) and saw this table on page 6:

enter image description here

Why does the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license in this Elsevier only allow "Text & data mine" for private use only and not for distribution? I understand one cannot make a commercial use of it but does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbids the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

ND (NoDerivatives) is described by creativecommons.org as follows:

If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

it's not obvious to me that the output of a text mining or data mining program necessarily qualifies as a derivative.

Does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbid the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

I was reading "Your Guide to Publishing Open Access with Elsevier" (URL: https://www.elsevier.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/181433/openaccessbooklet_May.pdf (mirror)) and saw this table on page 6:

Table describing permissions granted by various licences

Why does the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license in this Elsevier only allow "Text & data min[ing]" for private use only and not for distribution? I understand one cannot make commercial use of it but does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbid the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

ND (NoDerivatives) is described by creativecommons.org as follows:

If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

It's not obvious to me that the output of a text mining or data mining program necessarily qualifies as a derivative.

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Does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbids the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such license?

I was reading the "Your Guide to Publishing Open Access with Elsevier" (URL: https://www.elsevier.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/181433/openaccessbooklet_May.pdf (mirror)) and saw this table on page 6:

enter image description here

Why does the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license in this Elsevier only allow "Text & data mine" for private use only and not for distribution? I understand one cannot make a commercial use of it but does the ND (NoDerivatives) clause forbids the distribution of any form of text or data mining based on papers with such a license?

ND (NoDerivatives) is described by creativecommons.org as follows:

If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

it's not obvious to me that the output of a text mining or data mining program necessarily qualifies as a derivative.