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Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning  [first name] - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms  [last name] - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them.

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning  - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms  - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them.

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning [first name] - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms [last name] - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them.

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

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Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them. :(

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them. :(

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them.

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.

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Oh dear, this has hit the SE super collider. Since you're actually qualified to say if my spelling and grammar suck, my apologies in advance if any of this is written terribly.

In general, discrimination is in intent not in specific words. Since I live in the north part of England, I'm used to hearing strangers being addressed as "love", "hun" and occasionally "dear". The intent here isn't to condescend or be sexist, it's usually to open a conversation in a friendly way when you're about to ask them to do something and don't want to seem rude. Example:

Excuse me love, could you move over a little, I can't quite get past.

In this particular case, let's run through the potential ways to greet you:

  • Good morning teacher - No good, sounds like it's a form letter
  • Good morning - Inappropriate for addressing a person of authority
  • Good morning Ms - Better, but impersonal. Could be followed by "You're awesome" or "I hate you".
  • Good morning ma'am - What is this the military?

Ok, but seriously, "A great morning to you my dear lass," is certainly overly familiar, but I think it's more intended to convey "get ready, I'm about to say awesome things about you, are you sitting down and suitably braced for how awesome I think you are". I'd personally say that "A great morning to you Ms " would have been the better way approach.

If this person were British rather than American I'd interpret "my dear" as "you're a person I think highly of and are important to me", and "lass" as "woman who I want to imply seems younger than her age might actually be". I'll be fair and say that it's harder to give a similar compliment to man, since the nearest version of lass to refer to a guy would be "strapping young man"... that's a harder one to pull off. Considering in particular that he's of the older generation, I'd tend toward this being a sincere expression of thankfulness.

So how to handle it. Tactfully, very very tactfully. Don't suggest he's being sexist or condescending, that will likely not go well. Focus on the need for professionalism, that's something that can be held as a reason for the change without negative implications. Maybe something like...

Thank you for feedback, it's always good to hear students praise my teaching and let me know that the course helped them. [More specific responses to any points that need addressing in the original email].

While I'm flattered to be considered youthful, it is important for us as teachers hold a professional and impartial image with our students. Not managing to do this results in grading and feedback being seen with an unfair bias. It would really help if you could refer to me as even in correspondence. Apologies if that comes across as cold, I don't mean it to be rude.

If it turns out to be a one time thing then that would seem sufficiently handled to me.

It is, to be honest, a sad thing that modern culture makes it considerably harder to honestly flatter someone without it being interpreted as sexist or an inappropriate advance. It's even more sad that enough people do make sexist and overly forward remarks such that we default to that being the intention we infer from them. :(

There should really be a version of Hanlon's Razor that reads "Don't attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by social ineptitude." Well at least not until you've checked if it was meant to be insulting.