2 fixed typo
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There are two major reasons, both of which boil down to "Context".

  1. Graduate school is not "Undergrad+". There are few if any distribution requirements, and your coursework will follow a pretty specific subject. In contrast, your GPA is an amalgamation of all the classes you have ever taken. To use myself as an example, some major components of my GPA stemmed from 4 semesters of German, a feminist art history class on the middle ages (which was amazing) and a class on Grimm's Fairy Tales. As importantly, a number of classes didn't count toward my calculated GPA because they were taken while I was studying abroad, and thus the credits simply transferred. Most of these classes were in Microbiology. Assume I barely passed all of those. If I was applying to a microbiology program, do you think they'd prefer to see those classes broken out individually, or a composite score that's heavily influenced by being able to give reasons why the Bayeux Tapestry is more properly an embroidery, and why the Saxons in said embroidery are depicted weildingwielding axes?
  2. It lets the admissions committee actually look at you as a whole person. Did you take some classes outside your major that would never the less be useful? How well did you do in them? Did you take classically challenging classes (Organic Chemistry) that might explain why your GPA took a hit, or were you simply a middling student?

There are two major reasons, both of which boil down to "Context".

  1. Graduate school is not "Undergrad+". There are few if any distribution requirements, and your coursework will follow a pretty specific subject. In contrast, your GPA is an amalgamation of all the classes you have ever taken. To use myself as an example, some major components of my GPA stemmed from 4 semesters of German, a feminist art history class on the middle ages (which was amazing) and a class on Grimm's Fairy Tales. As importantly, a number of classes didn't count toward my calculated GPA because they were taken while I was studying abroad, and thus the credits simply transferred. Most of these classes were in Microbiology. Assume I barely passed all of those. If I was applying to a microbiology program, do you think they'd prefer to see those classes broken out individually, or a composite score that's heavily influenced by being able to give reasons why the Bayeux Tapestry is more properly an embroidery, and why the Saxons in said embroidery are depicted weilding axes?
  2. It lets the admissions committee actually look at you as a whole person. Did you take some classes outside your major that would never the less be useful? How well did you do in them? Did you take classically challenging classes (Organic Chemistry) that might explain why your GPA took a hit, or were you simply a middling student?

There are two major reasons, both of which boil down to "Context".

  1. Graduate school is not "Undergrad+". There are few if any distribution requirements, and your coursework will follow a pretty specific subject. In contrast, your GPA is an amalgamation of all the classes you have ever taken. To use myself as an example, some major components of my GPA stemmed from 4 semesters of German, a feminist art history class on the middle ages (which was amazing) and a class on Grimm's Fairy Tales. As importantly, a number of classes didn't count toward my calculated GPA because they were taken while I was studying abroad, and thus the credits simply transferred. Most of these classes were in Microbiology. Assume I barely passed all of those. If I was applying to a microbiology program, do you think they'd prefer to see those classes broken out individually, or a composite score that's heavily influenced by being able to give reasons why the Bayeux Tapestry is more properly an embroidery, and why the Saxons in said embroidery are depicted wielding axes?
  2. It lets the admissions committee actually look at you as a whole person. Did you take some classes outside your major that would never the less be useful? How well did you do in them? Did you take classically challenging classes (Organic Chemistry) that might explain why your GPA took a hit, or were you simply a middling student?
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source | link

There are two major reasons, both of which boil down to "Context".

  1. Graduate school is not "Undergrad+". There are few if any distribution requirements, and your coursework will follow a pretty specific subject. In contrast, your GPA is an amalgamation of all the classes you have ever taken. To use myself as an example, some major components of my GPA stemmed from 4 semesters of German, a feminist art history class on the middle ages (which was amazing) and a class on Grimm's Fairy Tales. As importantly, a number of classes didn't count toward my calculated GPA because they were taken while I was studying abroad, and thus the credits simply transferred. Most of these classes were in Microbiology. Assume I barely passed all of those. If I was applying to a microbiology program, do you think they'd prefer to see those classes broken out individually, or a composite score that's heavily influenced by being able to give reasons why the Bayeux Tapestry is more properly an embroidery, and why the Saxons in said embroidery are depicted weilding axes?
  2. It lets the admissions committee actually look at you as a whole person. Did you take some classes outside your major that would never the less be useful? How well did you do in them? Did you take classically challenging classes (Organic Chemistry) that might explain why your GPA took a hit, or were you simply a middling student?