3 usage of "base"; subject-verb agreement
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I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how they had performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it basesit's based on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student havehas performed well in the class and no other dishonesty havehas appeared so far.

I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how they had performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it bases on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student have performed well in the class and no other dishonesty have appeared so far.

I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how they had performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it's based on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student has performed well in the class and no other dishonesty has appeared so far.

2 added 2 characters in body
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I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how he hasthey had performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it bases on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student have performed well in the class and no other dishonesty have appeared so far.

I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how he has performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it bases on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student have performed well in the class and no other dishonesty have appeared so far.

I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how they had performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it bases on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student have performed well in the class and no other dishonesty have appeared so far.

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I do not think that you have to mention the incident and that you may well choose to not include it. What you do should mostly depend on what you think of the student now as the recommendation letter is used to estimate how the student will perform in the future and not to assess how he has performed in all previous life.

If you have reason to believe that the student learned their lesson from the incident and you think that you can recommend them, then I see two options:

  • You start from the assumption that the incident should not be something that should haunt the student forever and you just do not mention it. This is in line with your saying that "the student has already faced the consequences of their actions". Also, it bases on the view that the student should not be penalized twice for the exact same event. Also, copying solutions from the web verbatim does not appear to me as something which is so genuinely dishonest that the student should carry the weight of that incident forever.

  • You include the incident in the letter but add that the student have performed well in the class and no other dishonesty have appeared so far.