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While I generally agree this would be plagiarism, in some circumstances it would not - and not only in the allusion case (see @JonathanHayward 's answer).

Specifically, if you believe and have the author's concurrence that part of the article is folklore, or should not be considered an integral part of the article somehow and not really attributed to the author, then it's possible you're not committing plagiarism.

But you really should:

  1. Apply common sense, whilebut
  2. Always erringerr on the side of caution = the side of citation

Note also that you can make a qualified citation, e.g.

\footnote{This is discussed in Prof's John Smith's monograph on
the Frobincation of Bars \cite{JSFrob}, but blah blah blah}.

While I generally agree this would be plagiarism, in some circumstances it would not - and not only in the allusion case (see @JonathanHayward 's answer).

Specifically, if you believe and have the author's concurrence that part of the article is folklore, or should not be considered an integral part of the article somehow and not really attributed to the author, then it's possible you're not committing plagiarism.

But you really should:

  1. Apply common sense, while
  2. Always erring on the side of citation

Note also that you can make a qualified citation, e.g.

\footnote{This is discussed in Prof's John Smith's monograph on
the Frobincation of Bars \cite{JSFrob}, but blah blah blah}.

While I generally agree this would be plagiarism, in some circumstances it would not - and not only in the allusion case (see @JonathanHayward 's answer).

Specifically, if you believe and have the author's concurrence that part of the article is folklore, or should not be considered an integral part of the article somehow and not really attributed to the author, then it's possible you're not committing plagiarism.

But you really should:

  1. Apply common sense, but
  2. Always err on the side of caution = the side of citation

Note also that you can make a qualified citation, e.g.

\footnote{This is discussed in Prof's John Smith's monograph on
the Frobincation of Bars \cite{JSFrob}, but blah blah blah}.
1
source | link

While I generally agree this would be plagiarism, in some circumstances it would not - and not only in the allusion case (see @JonathanHayward 's answer).

Specifically, if you believe and have the author's concurrence that part of the article is folklore, or should not be considered an integral part of the article somehow and not really attributed to the author, then it's possible you're not committing plagiarism.

But you really should:

  1. Apply common sense, while
  2. Always erring on the side of citation

Note also that you can make a qualified citation, e.g.

\footnote{This is discussed in Prof's John Smith's monograph on
the Frobincation of Bars \cite{JSFrob}, but blah blah blah}.