Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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It sounds like you're in a non-English speaking country, and I assume that the reason you need an English-language transcript is for use in job or college applications to an English-speaking country. In that case, one reasonable option would be to do nothing and simply use the current transcript. My reasoning is that in an English-speaking country, seeing an official document with grammatical errors coming from a non-English speaking country (especially if it's a country whose people are well-known to not speak very good English) is not likely to surprise or trouble anyone. I personally read many documents written by people from such countries and don't recall ever thinking that the writer of the letter is incompetent or unprofessional because of grammatical errors (though I might think this because of the content of what they write, even when they express themselves in flawless English ;-)...) And, of course, you are not even the author of the transcript! So, if I were you, the only errors I would seriously worry about are either factual errors or grammatical errors that are so bad that they create a risk that some facts will be misunderstood (or not understood) by the reader of your transcript.

With that said, if you are still concerned about the errors posing a danger to you, some additional options I can think of are:

  • Getting a transcript in the language of your country and having a certified translation made (great suggestion by Patricia Shanahan!).

  • Creating a correct English transcript yourself in Word/LaTeX as you were suggesting and attaching it (together with the original transcript) to your applications with a note saying that you have corrected the grammatical errors in your original transcript and include it for the reader's convenience. I would only recommend this if your unofficial corrected transcript doesn't seem to suspiciously "correct" (in a way that may appear dishonest) certain facts that are ambiguous in the original ungrammatical version.

  • Attaching a note to any application you submit that includes your ungrammatical transcript, in which you apologize for the grammatical errors in the transcript and explain that you made a good-faith effort to get the errors corrected and was unsuccessful due to an incompetent service provider at your university. Possibly include a list of clarifications to correct ambiguities or small misstatements arising out of the grammatical errors in the transcript.

  • Finally, there's always the option of continuing to pursue the quixotic quest to get an error-free English transcript from the unprofessional clerk by complaining to their supervisor or to a more senior administrator. It sounds like you've wasted enough time and effort doing that, so I wouldn't recommend it (in particular since I've suggested several other courses of action that seem adequate to address the problem), but only you can decide how important this is to you.

Good luck!

It sounds like you're in a non-English speaking country, and I assume that the reason you need an English-language transcript is for use in job or college applications to an English-speaking country. In that case, one reasonable option would be to do nothing and simply use the current transcript. My reasoning is that in an English-speaking country, seeing an official document with grammatical errors coming from a non-English speaking country (especially if it's a country whose people are well-known to not speak very good English) is not likely to surprise or trouble anyone. I personally read many documents written by people from such countries and don't recall ever thinking that the writer of the letter is incompetent or unprofessional because of grammatical errors (though I might think this because of the content of what they write, even when they express themselves in flawless English ;-)...) So, if I were you, the only errors I would seriously worry about are either factual errors or grammatical errors that are so bad that they create a risk that some facts will be misunderstood (or not understood) by the reader of your transcript.

With that said, if you are still concerned about the errors posing a danger to you, some additional options I can think of are:

  • Getting a transcript in the language of your country and having a certified translation made (great suggestion by Patricia Shanahan!).

  • Creating a correct English transcript yourself in Word/LaTeX as you were suggesting and attaching it (together with the original transcript) to your applications with a note saying that you have corrected the grammatical errors in your original transcript and include it for the reader's convenience. I would only recommend this if your unofficial corrected transcript doesn't seem to suspiciously "correct" (in a way that may appear dishonest) certain facts that are ambiguous in the original ungrammatical version.

  • Attaching a note to any application you submit that includes your ungrammatical transcript, in which you apologize for the grammatical errors in the transcript and explain that you made a good-faith effort to get the errors corrected and was unsuccessful due to an incompetent service provider at your university. Possibly include a list of clarifications to correct ambiguities or small misstatements arising out of the grammatical errors in the transcript.

  • Finally, there's always the option of continuing to pursue the quixotic quest to get an error-free English transcript from the unprofessional clerk by complaining to their supervisor or to a more senior administrator. It sounds like you've wasted enough time and effort doing that, so I wouldn't recommend it (in particular since I've suggested several other courses of action that seem adequate to address the problem), but only you can decide how important this is to you.

Good luck!

It sounds like you're in a non-English speaking country, and I assume that the reason you need an English-language transcript is for use in job or college applications to an English-speaking country. In that case, one reasonable option would be to do nothing and simply use the current transcript. My reasoning is that in an English-speaking country, seeing an official document with grammatical errors coming from a non-English speaking country (especially if it's a country whose people are well-known to not speak very good English) is not likely to surprise or trouble anyone. I personally read many documents written by people from such countries and don't recall ever thinking that the writer of the letter is incompetent or unprofessional because of grammatical errors (though I might think this because of the content of what they write, even when they express themselves in flawless English ;-)...) And, of course, you are not even the author of the transcript! So, if I were you, the only errors I would seriously worry about are either factual errors or grammatical errors that are so bad that they create a risk that some facts will be misunderstood (or not understood) by the reader of your transcript.

With that said, if you are still concerned about the errors posing a danger to you, some additional options I can think of are:

  • Getting a transcript in the language of your country and having a certified translation made (great suggestion by Patricia Shanahan!).

  • Creating a correct English transcript yourself in Word/LaTeX as you were suggesting and attaching it (together with the original transcript) to your applications with a note saying that you have corrected the grammatical errors in your original transcript and include it for the reader's convenience. I would only recommend this if your unofficial corrected transcript doesn't seem to suspiciously "correct" (in a way that may appear dishonest) certain facts that are ambiguous in the original ungrammatical version.

  • Attaching a note to any application you submit that includes your ungrammatical transcript, in which you apologize for the grammatical errors in the transcript and explain that you made a good-faith effort to get the errors corrected and was unsuccessful due to an incompetent service provider at your university. Possibly include a list of clarifications to correct ambiguities or small misstatements arising out of the grammatical errors in the transcript.

  • Finally, there's always the option of continuing to pursue the quixotic quest to get an error-free English transcript from the unprofessional clerk by complaining to their supervisor or to a more senior administrator. It sounds like you've wasted enough time and effort doing that, so I wouldn't recommend it (in particular since I've suggested several other courses of action that seem adequate to address the problem), but only you can decide how important this is to you.

Good luck!

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It sounds like you're in a non-English speaking country, and I assume that the reason you need an English-language transcript is for use in job or college applications to an English-speaking country. In that case, one reasonable option would be to do nothing and simply use the current transcript. My reasoning is that in an English-speaking country, seeing an official document with grammatical errors coming from a non-English speaking country (especially if it's a country whose people are well-known to not speak very good English) is not likely to surprise or trouble anyone. I personally read many documents written by people from such countries and don't recall ever thinking that the writer of the letter is incompetent or unprofessional because of grammatical errors (though I might think this because of the content of what they write, even when they express themselves in flawless English ;-)...) So, if I were you, the only errors I would seriously worry about are either factual errors or grammatical errors that are so bad that they create a risk that some facts will be misunderstood (or not understood) by the reader of your transcript.

With that said, if you are still concerned about the errors posing a danger to you, some additional options I can think of are:

  • Getting a transcript in the language of your country and having a certified translation made (great suggestion by Patricia Shanahan!).

  • Creating a correct English transcript yourself in Word/LaTeX as you were suggesting and attaching it (together with the original transcript) to your applications with a note saying that you have corrected the grammatical errors in your original transcript and include it for the reader's convenience. I would only recommend this if your unofficial corrected transcript doesn't seem to suspiciously "correct" (in a way that may appear dishonest) certain facts that are ambiguous in the original ungrammatical version.

  • Attaching a note to any application you submit that includes your ungrammatical transcript, in which you apologize for the grammatical errors in the transcript and explain that you made a good-faith effort to get the errors corrected and was unsuccessful due to an incompetent service provider at your university. Possibly include a list of clarifications to correct ambiguities or small misstatements arising out of the grammatical errors in the transcript.

  • Finally, there's always the option of continuing to pursue the quixotic quest to get an error-free English transcript from the unprofessional clerk by complaining to their supervisor or to a more senior administrator. It sounds like you've wasted enough time and effort doing that, so I wouldn't recommend it (in particular since I've suggested several other courses of action that seem adequate to address the problem), but only you can decide how important this is to you.

Good luck!