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I am a PhD student and thereby not qualified to answer the question in the intended spirit of the OP. Still I feel an urge to express my opinions in a general context since I find no logical explanation that negate the following. I Assuming that the student is interested in the subject, I would advise an enthusiastic studententhusiastic student that there are 3 major ways that you would loose your motivation.

1. Anxieties of the Past.

Thinking about something negative happened in the past and worrying that it will happen again. E.g. I had failed to understand General relativity even though I tried 3 times. I am going to fail again.

2. Anxieties of the Future.

Thinking of what to say in my Nobel prize speech in the middle of a Gaussian curve fit.

3. Anxieties of the Present.

Thinking of the numerous parameters to be given for the fitting function, leaving the data untouched from morning to afternoon. After noon, its lunch and I need some rest.

I would advise my student to block these while doing your work, think of what need to be done now, never lose your energy thinking of the results that are yet to come in the future and concentrate all your efforts for the single piece of work that you are doing and thus results will be excellent.

I am a PhD student and thereby not qualified to answer the question in the intended spirit of the OP. Still I feel an urge to express my opinions since I find no logical explanation that negate the following. I would advise an enthusiastic student that there are 3 major ways that you would loose your motivation.

1. Anxieties of the Past.

Thinking about something negative happened in the past and worrying that it will happen again. E.g. I had failed to understand General relativity even though I tried 3 times. I am going to fail again.

2. Anxieties of the Future.

Thinking of what to say in my Nobel prize speech in the middle of a Gaussian curve fit.

3. Anxieties of the Present.

Thinking of the numerous parameters to be given for the fitting function, leaving the data untouched from morning to afternoon. After noon, its lunch and I need some rest.

I would advise my student to block these while doing your work, think of what need to be done now, never lose your energy thinking of the results that are yet to come in the future and concentrate all your efforts for the single piece of work that you are doing and thus results will be excellent.

I am a PhD student and thereby not qualified to answer the question in the intended spirit of the OP. Still I feel an urge to express my opinions in a general context since I find no logical explanation that negate the following. Assuming that the student is interested in the subject, I would advise an enthusiastic student that there are 3 major ways that you would loose your motivation.

1. Anxieties of the Past.

Thinking about something negative happened in the past and worrying that it will happen again. E.g. I had failed to understand General relativity even though I tried 3 times. I am going to fail again.

2. Anxieties of the Future.

Thinking of what to say in my Nobel prize speech in the middle of a Gaussian curve fit.

3. Anxieties of the Present.

Thinking of the numerous parameters to be given for the fitting function, leaving the data untouched from morning to afternoon. After noon, its lunch and I need some rest.

I would advise my student to block these while doing your work, think of what need to be done now, never lose your energy thinking of the results that are yet to come in the future and concentrate all your efforts for the single piece of work that you are doing and thus results will be excellent.

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source | link

I am a PhD student and thereby not qualified to answer the question in the intended spirit of the OP. Still I feel an urge to express my opinions since I find no logical explanation that negate the following. I would advise an enthusiastic student that there are 3 major ways that you would loose your motivation.

1. Anxieties of the Past.

Thinking about something negative happened in the past and worrying that it will happen again. E.g. I had failed to understand General relativity even though I tried 3 times. I am going to fail again.

2. Anxieties of the Future.

Thinking of what to say in my Nobel prize speech in the middle of a Gaussian curve fit.

3. Anxieties of the Present.

Thinking of the numerous parameters to be given for the fitting function, leaving the data untouched from morning to afternoon. After noon, its lunch and I need some rest.

I would advise my student to block these while doing your work, think of what need to be done now, never lose your energy thinking of the results that are yet to come in the future and concentrate all your efforts for the single piece of work that you are doing and thus results will be excellent.