4 added 2 characters in body
source | link

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely than average to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. Whatever their subject, they're familiar with the notion of precision. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it'sand that's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, or that it's necessary to be inaccurate in order to be polite: one can always be accurate and also take time to be considerate. But if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely than average to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. Whatever their subject, they're familiar with the notion of precision. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, or that it's necessary to be inaccurate in order to be polite: one can always be accurate and also take time to be considerate. But if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely than average to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. Whatever their subject, they're familiar with the notion of precision. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, and that's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, or that it's necessary to be inaccurate in order to be polite: one can always be accurate and also take time to be considerate. But if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

3 added 67 characters in body
source | link

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely than average to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. Whatever their subject, they're familiar with the notion of precision. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, butor that it's necessary to be inaccurate in order to be polite: one can always be accurate and also take time to be considerate. But if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, but if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely than average to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. Whatever their subject, they're familiar with the notion of precision. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, or that it's necessary to be inaccurate in order to be polite: one can always be accurate and also take time to be considerate. But if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

2 added 490 characters in body
source | link

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, but if you consider it rudeimpolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you shouldwill probably need to consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise.

That's not to say academics are always rude, but if you consider it rude for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you should probably consider again :-)

They mean different things. "OK" means you have approval to continue as outlined in your email. "Hello, It is fine. This is the correct approach." means that the other person has specific positive knowledge that (a) there is a known correct approach and (b) what you've described in your email is that.

It would be wrong for someone, in an attempt to add extra words to their email for the sake of polite encouragement, to say something that isn't what they really mean.

At risk of perpetrating a stereotype, academics are more likely to be the kind of people, and operate in the kind of environment, where accuracy of expression is valued over diplomatic platitudes and polite but unwarranted praise. But it's not just academics: you'll often find enclaves in professional environments where people customarily do the same thing in email. You'll also find groups who don't communicate this way in email, rather they always write complete sentences. You'll find people who do different things for different audiences. Maybe this academic is one of them, but since they've offended you they have perhaps misjudged what kind of audience you are. But equally you seem to expect everyone to write complete sentences all the time, but it's just not how everyone uses email.

That's not to say academics are always rude, but if you consider it impolite or indecent for a reasonably busy person to give a curt but accurate reply, then you're swimming against the tide and you will probably need to consider again :-)

1
source | link