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It depends a lot on the culture. I think professors (for example) implicitly have the right to short or curt emails regardless. In the United states, I think if you are polite to your teachers (avoid the word professor) , you don't have to worry too much about writing long elaborate emails. For example you can call them by their first name rather than using a title.

Hi John, I was curious if x. Thanks, and then just use your first name in the signature.

Think of emails in the Unites States as "business casual" - well dressed but not ornate.

It depends a lot on the culture. I think professors (for example) implicitly have the right to short or curt emails regardless. In the United states, I think if you are polite, you don't have to worry too much about writing long elaborate emails. For example you can call them by their first name rather than using a title.

Hi John, I was curious if x. Thanks, and then just use your first name in the signature.

Think of emails in the Unites States as "business casual" - well dressed but not ornate.

It depends a lot on the culture. I think professors (for example) implicitly have the right to short or curt emails regardless. In the United states, I think if you are polite to your teachers (avoid the word professor) , you don't have to worry too much about writing long elaborate emails. For example you can call them by their first name rather than using a title.

Hi John, I was curious if x. Thanks, and then just use your first name in the signature.

Think of emails in the Unites States as "business casual" - well dressed but not ornate.

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source | link

It depends a lot on the culture. I think professors (for example) implicitly have the right to short or curt emails regardless. In the United states, I think if you are polite, you don't have to worry too much about writing long elaborate emails. For example you can call them by their first name rather than using a title.

Hi John, I was curious if x. Thanks, and then just use your first name in the signature.

Think of emails in the Unites States as "business casual" - well dressed but not ornate.