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A major part of good science, is not only performing good research, but also convincing others that your science is worthwhile. A common belief of researchers is that their job is done after they have proved their idea–noowidea – now it is the community's turn of the community to see how awesome their science is.1,2

Maybe a first step is to make your student see this.

The next step would be that he works only on hypothesis/direction on which both of you agree: "if you cannot convince me that this hypothesis is correct, how can you convince the entire community"? To take off the personal issue (i.e., the feeling of your student that maybe he is smarter than you, and it is just you that don't understand), you can use his PhD committee, if you have such in your institution. If a committee of 3-4 established researchers don't understand "how brilliant his results are", this is a good indication that the rest of the community will not be able to understand it, and therefore, even if it is great science, it is futile.

The main thing in the above approach, is that it doesn't confront his ambitions, and doesn't (directly) say that his work is meaningless. Instead, it states that great work by itself is meaningless unless accepted by others. It would be great to channel his enthusiasm to the correct direction - but this direction must be provided, or at least guided by you (his advisor), this is what advisors are for.


References:
1 Why is my theory not (yet) celebrated by scientific community?
2 I believe I have solved a famous open problem. How do I convince people in the field that I am not a crank?

A major part of good science, is not only performing good research, but also convincing others that your science is worthwhile. A common belief of researchers is that their job is done after they have proved their idea–noow it is the turn of the community to see how awesome their science is.1,2

Maybe a first step is to make your student see this.

The next step would be that he works only on hypothesis/direction on which both of you agree: "if you cannot convince me that this hypothesis is correct, how can you convince the entire community"? To take off the personal issue (i.e., the feeling of your student that maybe he is smarter than you, and it is just you that don't understand), you can use his PhD committee, if you have such in your institution. If a committee of 3-4 established researchers don't understand "how brilliant his results are", this is a good indication that the rest of the community will not be able to understand it, and therefore, even if it great science, it is futile.

The main thing in the above approach, is that it doesn't confront his ambitions, and doesn't (directly) say that his work is meaningless. Instead, it states that great work by itself is meaningless unless accepted by others. It would be great to channel his enthusiasm to the correct direction - but this direction must be provided, or at least guided by you (his advisor), this is what advisors are for.


References:
1 Why is my theory not (yet) celebrated by scientific community?
2 I believe I have solved a famous open problem. How do I convince people in the field that I am not a crank?

A major part of good science, is not only performing good research, but also convincing others that your science is worthwhile. A common belief of researchers is that their job is done after they have proved their idea – now it is the community's turn to see how awesome their science is.1,2

Maybe a first step is to make your student see this.

The next step would be that he works only on hypothesis/direction on which both of you agree: "if you cannot convince me that this hypothesis is correct, how can you convince the entire community"? To take off the personal issue (i.e., the feeling of your student that maybe he is smarter than you, and it is just you that don't understand), you can use his PhD committee, if you have such in your institution. If a committee of 3-4 established researchers don't understand "how brilliant his results are", this is a good indication that the rest of the community will not be able to understand it, and therefore, even if it is great science, it is futile.

The main thing in the above approach, is that it doesn't confront his ambitions, and doesn't (directly) say that his work is meaningless. Instead, it states that great work by itself is meaningless unless accepted by others. It would be great to channel his enthusiasm to the correct direction but this direction must be provided, or at least guided by you (his advisor), this is what advisors are for.


References:
1 Why is my theory not (yet) celebrated by scientific community?
2 I believe I have solved a famous open problem. How do I convince people in the field that I am not a crank?

1
source | link

A major part of good science, is not only performing good research, but also convincing others that your science is worthwhile. A common belief of researchers is that their job is done after they have proved their idea–noow it is the turn of the community to see how awesome their science is.1,2

Maybe a first step is to make your student see this.

The next step would be that he works only on hypothesis/direction on which both of you agree: "if you cannot convince me that this hypothesis is correct, how can you convince the entire community"? To take off the personal issue (i.e., the feeling of your student that maybe he is smarter than you, and it is just you that don't understand), you can use his PhD committee, if you have such in your institution. If a committee of 3-4 established researchers don't understand "how brilliant his results are", this is a good indication that the rest of the community will not be able to understand it, and therefore, even if it great science, it is futile.

The main thing in the above approach, is that it doesn't confront his ambitions, and doesn't (directly) say that his work is meaningless. Instead, it states that great work by itself is meaningless unless accepted by others. It would be great to channel his enthusiasm to the correct direction - but this direction must be provided, or at least guided by you (his advisor), this is what advisors are for.


References:
1 Why is my theory not (yet) celebrated by scientific community?
2 I believe I have solved a famous open problem. How do I convince people in the field that I am not a crank?