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I wrote an essay for a professor of mine, in which I cited a book he had written. As it so happens, the citation is based on my having obtained a (most likely) pirated PDF copy of the book. The text is quite expensive, rather than having purchased itnot readily available anywhere (library, textbook store, or Amazon) aside from a bookstore myself. While the essay implies that I've read the book thoroughlypublisher, and the subject matter is esoteric and poorly addressed in truth I'veother papers. I am only read a few relevant sectionsciting less than 10 pages worth of material, mostly related toon definitions and problem formulation.

I am going to be presenting this essay in front of the class, and my concern is that he will notice the citation of his book and ask the potentially uncomfortable question of "...so you have one of my books...?"

I'm wondering what I should do in this case. Should I simply remove all references to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? Should I not do anything? Is the citation of a text that you pirated really a big deal in academia?

I wrote an essay for a professor of mine, in which I cited a book he had written. As it so happens, the citation is based on my having obtained a (most likely) pirated PDF copy of the book, rather than having purchased it from a bookstore myself. While the essay implies that I've read the book thoroughly, in truth I've only read a few relevant sections, mostly related to definitions and problem formulation.

I am going to be presenting this essay in front of the class, and my concern is that he will notice the citation of his book and ask the potentially uncomfortable question of "...so you have one of my books...?"

I'm wondering what I should do in this case. Should I simply remove all references to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? Should I not do anything? Is the citation of a text that you pirated really a big deal in academia?

I wrote an essay for a professor of mine, in which I cited a book he had written. As it so happens, the citation is based on my having obtained a (most likely) pirated PDF copy of the book. The text is quite expensive, not readily available anywhere (library, textbook store, or Amazon) aside from the publisher, and the subject matter is esoteric and poorly addressed in other papers. I am only citing less than 10 pages worth of material, mostly on definitions and problem formulation

I am going to be presenting this essay in front of the class, and my concern is that he will notice the citation of his book and ask the potentially uncomfortable question of "...so you have one of my books...?"

I'm wondering what I should do in this case. Should I simply remove all references to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? Should I not do anything? Is the citation of a text that you pirated really a big deal in academia?

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Background


It should go without saying that pirating of books from online databases is at I wrote an all time highessay for this generationa professor of learners, researchers, teachersmine, professors... and just about everyone. Hundreds of databases in dozens of languages are readily available, some with limitless downloads, and are shared openly withoutwhich I cited a shred of ethical concerns. Most of the books downloaded are not even related to academia, for example, Karma Sutra, Harry Potter and 50 Shade of Grey are some of the top illegal downloadsbook he had written.

  As disheartening as it may sound to many professors with textbooks of their ownso happens, I have yet to meetthe citation is based on my having obtained a person who does not have several pdf copies of text books. In fact, it seems that in some faculties with established and highly esteemed texts (such as mathematics, science and engineering), many students have stopped buying books all together. From personal observation, people who do buy textbooks are either 1) forced by course (text rotations, open notes exams), 2) relatively wealthy, 3most likely) pirated PDF copy of the book worshipper (...of texts such as Munkres, Sedra & Smith and CLRS) 4) first year freshman undergrads. Even for people who doesn't go on these databases, a simple request from another student would usually suffice.

The preponderance of this behavior is not to sayrather than having purchased it is ethical to pirate books from online, but it is an unavoidable reality our knowledge based information societya bookstore myself.


Here is my concern:

I cited two books for an "essay", one of which was written by the professor ofWhile the course. (Feel free to replace essay with thesis, article, paper, etc.)

Of course the "essay" was quite detailed which implies heavily that I had thoroughlyI've read the textbooks. The text is quite expensive, not readily available anywhere (librarybook thoroughly, textbook store or amazon) aside from the publisher and the subject matter is esoteric and poorly addressed in other papers and I amtruth I've only citing less than 10 pages worth of materialread a few relevant sections, mostly onrelated to definitions and problem formulation. Now 

I am going to have a presentation about the "essay"be presenting this essay in front of the class, and I am afraidmy concern is that he will notice the citation of his book and raiseask the potentially uncomfortable questions such asquestion of "..."soso you have one of my books...?"

What makes the matter a little bit worse is the second book that I pirated/cited was written by his supervisor - who I later found out died less than 5 month ago - and my current professor helped in editing the book when he was a student.

Now I amI'm wondering what I should do in this case. ShouldShould I simply remove all referencereferences to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? A part of me thinks it is the best to avoid an uncomfortable situation, another part of me thinks that even ifShould I went ahead with the presentation the professor would not notice the citation, nor would he care.

But in the worse case scenario would be that he finds out I had pirated his (and his beloved mentor's) book and thus start a huge academic grudge which I cannot afford to have at this stage.

Can anyone recommend a course of actiondo anything? Is the citation of a text (thatthat you pirated) really a big deal in academia? Can any current professors weigh in on this dilemma?

Background


It should go without saying that pirating of books from online databases is at an all time high for this generation of learners, researchers, teachers, professors... and just about everyone. Hundreds of databases in dozens of languages are readily available, some with limitless downloads, and are shared openly without a shred of ethical concerns. Most of the books downloaded are not even related to academia, for example, Karma Sutra, Harry Potter and 50 Shade of Grey are some of the top illegal downloads.

  As disheartening as it may sound to many professors with textbooks of their own, I have yet to meet a person who does not have several pdf copies of text books. In fact, it seems that in some faculties with established and highly esteemed texts (such as mathematics, science and engineering), many students have stopped buying books all together. From personal observation, people who do buy textbooks are either 1) forced by course (text rotations, open notes exams), 2) relatively wealthy, 3) book worshipper (...of texts such as Munkres, Sedra & Smith and CLRS) 4) first year freshman undergrads. Even for people who doesn't go on these databases, a simple request from another student would usually suffice.

The preponderance of this behavior is not to say it is ethical to pirate books from online, but it is an unavoidable reality our knowledge based information society.


Here is my concern:

I cited two books for an "essay", one of which was written by the professor of the course. (Feel free to replace essay with thesis, article, paper, etc.)

Of course the "essay" was quite detailed which implies heavily that I had thoroughly read the textbooks. The text is quite expensive, not readily available anywhere (library, textbook store or amazon) aside from the publisher and the subject matter is esoteric and poorly addressed in other papers and I am only citing less than 10 pages worth of material mostly on definitions and problem formulation. Now I am going to have a presentation about the "essay" in front of the class and I am afraid that he will notice the citation of his book and raise uncomfortable questions such as..."so you have one of my books...?"

What makes the matter a little bit worse is the second book that I pirated/cited was written by his supervisor - who I later found out died less than 5 month ago - and my current professor helped in editing the book when he was a student.

Now I am wondering what I should do in this case. Should I simply remove all reference to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? A part of me thinks it is the best to avoid an uncomfortable situation, another part of me thinks that even if I went ahead with the presentation the professor would not notice the citation, nor would he care.

But in the worse case scenario would be that he finds out I had pirated his (and his beloved mentor's) book and thus start a huge academic grudge which I cannot afford to have at this stage.

Can anyone recommend a course of action? Is the citation of a text (that you pirated) really a big deal in academia? Can any current professors weigh in on this dilemma?

I wrote an essay for a professor of mine, in which I cited a book he had written. As it so happens, the citation is based on my having obtained a (most likely) pirated PDF copy of the book, rather than having purchased it from a bookstore myself. While the essay implies that I've read the book thoroughly, in truth I've only read a few relevant sections, mostly related to definitions and problem formulation. 

I am going to be presenting this essay in front of the class, and my concern is that he will notice the citation of his book and ask the potentially uncomfortable question of "...so you have one of my books...?"

I'm wondering what I should do in this case. Should I simply remove all references to the problem texts and cited portions and pretend that nothing ever happened? Should I not do anything? Is the citation of a text that you pirated really a big deal in academia?

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