Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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In my mind, I see the Linux source code as a single bibliography entry (possibly with its official Githubkernel.org repository as the source URL, as stated in my comment). You can refer to the different files in the text as \cite[Version~4.1, \texttt{drivers/android/binder.c}, Line~18]{Linux}. I guess all your readers will know how to navigate inside a Github repository

EDIT: suggested kernel.org instead of github, as pointed out by bdsl, sebleblanc and Bruno.

In my mind, I see the Linux source code as a single bibliography entry (possibly with its official Github repository as the source URL, as stated in my comment). You can refer to the different files in the text as \cite[Version~4.1, \texttt{drivers/android/binder.c}, Line~18]{Linux}. I guess all your readers will know how to navigate inside a Github repository.

In my mind, I see the Linux source code as a single bibliography entry (possibly with its official kernel.org repository as the source URL). You can refer to the different files in the text as \cite[Version~4.1, \texttt{drivers/android/binder.c}, Line~18]{Linux}.

EDIT: suggested kernel.org instead of github, as pointed out by bdsl, sebleblanc and Bruno.

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source | link

In my mind, I see the Linux source code as a single bibliography entry (possibly with its official Github repository as the source URL, as stated in my comment). You can refer to the different files in the text as \cite[Version~4.1, \texttt{drivers/android/binder.c}, Line~18]{Linux}. I guess all your readers will know how to navigate inside a Github repository.