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Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking aboutAssuming the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happeningsituation is in the U.SIndia based on link in OP's post.)

To answer your specific questions:

Can I do anything at all to change the status quo? How should I go about collecting facts around this and document my findings as something concrete that will likely create an impact?

I would advise to save yourself a lot of time and frustration and not challenge the established system. I agree with previous posters who also advised against this. If the system is complicit and the practice exists in spite of widespread awareness of it, then you are facing an uphill battle that should not be where you need to invest your time as a student.

An exception might be a situation that nobody (or only a few accomplices) is aware of, in which case whistle-blowing might yield results with minimum adverse impact for you. As it stands, even if you step forward, you will likely face retribution and will lose more than you will gain, except a clear conscience.

Instead, I would suggest to speak up through your own example and action: take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution. Once you are safely established in another university, write an (anonymous) but public, open letter to the administration of the "problem" university outlining your reasons for leaving in relation to the cheating practice.

To make it count, you might consider publishing your letter as an anonymous (under a pseudonym) letter to the editor of a more progressive local newspaper in the city where this university is located, in print and/or online (especially online, where it cannot be forgotten the next day). Public shaming can be a powerful weapon, especially in the East/Southeast Asian cultures...

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking about the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happening in the U.S.)

To answer your specific questions:

Can I do anything at all to change the status quo? How should I go about collecting facts around this and document my findings as something concrete that will likely create an impact?

I would advise to save yourself a lot of time and frustration and not challenge the established system. I agree with previous posters who also advised against this. If the system is complicit and the practice exists in spite of widespread awareness of it, then you are facing an uphill battle that should not be where you need to invest your time as a student.

An exception might be a situation that nobody (or only a few accomplices) is aware of, in which case whistle-blowing might yield results with minimum adverse impact for you. As it stands, even if you step forward, you will likely face retribution and will lose more than you will gain, except a clear conscience.

Instead, I would suggest to speak up through your own example and action: take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution. Once you are safely established in another university, write an (anonymous) but public, open letter to the administration of the "problem" university outlining your reasons for leaving in relation to the cheating practice.

To make it count, you might consider publishing your letter as an anonymous (under a pseudonym) letter to the editor of a more progressive local newspaper in the city where this university is located, in print and/or online (especially online, where it cannot be forgotten the next day). Public shaming can be a powerful weapon, especially in the East/Southeast Asian cultures...

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Assuming the situation is in India based on link in OP's post.

To answer your specific questions:

Can I do anything at all to change the status quo? How should I go about collecting facts around this and document my findings as something concrete that will likely create an impact?

I would advise to save yourself a lot of time and frustration and not challenge the established system. I agree with previous posters who also advised against this. If the system is complicit and the practice exists in spite of widespread awareness of it, then you are facing an uphill battle that should not be where you need to invest your time as a student.

An exception might be a situation that nobody (or only a few accomplices) is aware of, in which case whistle-blowing might yield results with minimum adverse impact for you. As it stands, even if you step forward, you will likely face retribution and will lose more than you will gain, except a clear conscience.

Instead, I would suggest to speak up through your own example and action: take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution. Once you are safely established in another university, write an (anonymous) but public, open letter to the administration of the "problem" university outlining your reasons for leaving in relation to the cheating practice.

To make it count, you might consider publishing your letter as an anonymous (under a pseudonym) letter to the editor of a more progressive local newspaper in the city where this university is located, in print and/or online (especially online, where it cannot be forgotten the next day). Public shaming can be a powerful weapon, especially in the East/Southeast Asian cultures...

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

2 added 900 characters in body
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Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking about the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happening in the U.S.)

In anyTo answer your specific questions:

Can I do anything at all to change the status quo? How should I go about collecting facts around this and document my findings as something concrete that will likely create an impact?

I would advise to save yourself a lot of time and frustration and not challenge the established system. I agree with previous posters who also advised against this. If the system is complicit and the practice exists in spite of widespread awareness of it, then you are facing an uphill battle that should not be where you need to invest your time as a student.

An exception might be a situation that nobody (or only a few accomplices) is aware of, in which case whistle-blowing might yield results with minimum adverse impact for you. As it stands, even if possibleyou step forward, you will likely face retribution and will lose more than you will gain, except a clear conscience.

Instead, I would suggest to speak up through your own example and action: take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution. Once you are safely established in another university, write an (anonymous) but public, open letter to the administration of the "problem" university outlining your reasons for leaving in relation to the cheating practice.

To make it count, you might consider publishing your letter as an anonymous (under a pseudonym) letter to the editor of a more progressive local newspaper in the city where this university is located, in print and/or online (especially online, where it cannot be forgotten the next day). Public shaming can be a powerful weapon, especially in the East/Southeast Asian cultures...

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking about the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happening in the U.S.)

In any case, if possible, I would suggest to take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution.

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking about the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happening in the U.S.)

To answer your specific questions:

Can I do anything at all to change the status quo? How should I go about collecting facts around this and document my findings as something concrete that will likely create an impact?

I would advise to save yourself a lot of time and frustration and not challenge the established system. I agree with previous posters who also advised against this. If the system is complicit and the practice exists in spite of widespread awareness of it, then you are facing an uphill battle that should not be where you need to invest your time as a student.

An exception might be a situation that nobody (or only a few accomplices) is aware of, in which case whistle-blowing might yield results with minimum adverse impact for you. As it stands, even if you step forward, you will likely face retribution and will lose more than you will gain, except a clear conscience.

Instead, I would suggest to speak up through your own example and action: take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution. Once you are safely established in another university, write an (anonymous) but public, open letter to the administration of the "problem" university outlining your reasons for leaving in relation to the cheating practice.

To make it count, you might consider publishing your letter as an anonymous (under a pseudonym) letter to the editor of a more progressive local newspaper in the city where this university is located, in print and/or online (especially online, where it cannot be forgotten the next day). Public shaming can be a powerful weapon, especially in the East/Southeast Asian cultures...

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!

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Sounds like extreme case and very difficult situation. Are we talking about the U.S. or another country? (I cannot imagine this happening in the U.S.)

In any case, if possible, I would suggest to take whatever knowledge you've learned with you and move to another place where you can enter a more reputable institution.

What you are describing does indeed sound like a waste of your time in a formal education environment.

Therefore, I'd say to cut your losses while you still have time, enroll in a better school (transfer credits from this school if you can) and finish your degree there.

In the end, this is about principles, and what your education and future is worth to you. It is easiest to think short-term: "hey, others are still studying here and seem to be graduating and getting OK jobs, why should I be different?" Such short-term thinking might give temporary comfort.

But the long term cost of such near-sightedness will be high: foregone opportunities, low reputation of your degree, limited job prospects, and a different self-image and identity as a result. To me these factors seem important enough to seriously evaluate other options.

Even if a better choice may be more difficult in the short term (finding/moving to another area and enrolling in another institution), the long-term wisdom of such a decision is not to be underestimated. It will pay dividends with better education, better career prospects, and a brighter future. You will thank yourself for it soon enough. Good luck!