3 added 12 characters in body
source | link

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced as an undergrad.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content madeideas taught facilitated graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced as an undergrad.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content made graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced as an undergrad.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The ideas taught facilitated graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

2 deleted 5 characters in body
source | link

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer this semester who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced at unias an undergrad.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content made graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer this semester who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced at uni.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content made graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced as an undergrad.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content made graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.

1
source | link

I have a few additions on top of the related question.

I don't think you should be too concerned about your abilities. Your domain knowledge will be beyond the vast majority of the undergraduate students, and thus you will acquire knowledge very quickly. It is inevitable that you will miss some of the obscurities and fine details in the first time running the course, regardless of your graphics background.

Specifically about Computer Graphics: I had a lecturer this semester who had no background in computer graphics. She was taking the course for the first time, and it was one of the best courses I've experienced at uni.

Factors contributing to success:

  • She took material from the previous lecturer (who had experienced success) and adapted it to her needs.
  • She used many illustrative, well-commented code examples
  • The assignments were fun, the results were impressive, and there was much opportunity for creativity and your own modifications. (bonus marks awarded for 'extension' tasks such as rain, fire, shadow effects)
  • Lectures were absolutely full of practical examples. She wrote code on the spot and demonstrated how they affected the graphics. She solved mathematical equations on the spot and connected them up to code examples.
  • The content made graphical effects that were impressive and instructive, and with simple code examples. For example, a rain effect is constructed very concisely by randomly generating 2D rectangles, and you can teach billboarding with it. A realistic tree is constructed concisely with a lindenmayer system.

The course website is open to everyone.

I think you should mention that it is your first time teaching it, and ask the students for feedback during the semester (early in the course). They will be more forgiving and more inclined to offer helpful suggestions.