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Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

In my experience, employers both in academia and industry want good candidates to start rather earlier than later, and are often not planning far ahead with their personnel decisions.

Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

In my experience, employers both in academia and industry want good candidates to start rather earlier than later, and are often not planning far ahead with their personnel decisions.

Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

In my experience, employers both in academia and industry want good candidates to start rather earlier than later, and are often not planning far ahead with their personnel decisions.

2 deleted 8 characters in body
source | link

Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

I more often make the observation that people are pushed into starting earlierIn my experience, employers both in academia and industry want good candidates to start rather earlier than later, and are often not having applied early enoughplanning far ahead with their personnel decisions.

Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

I more often make the observation that people are pushed into starting earlier, rather than not having applied early enough.

Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

In my experience, employers both in academia and industry want good candidates to start rather earlier than later, and are often not planning far ahead with their personnel decisions.

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Positions are often advertised on an extremely short notice, at least in my field (computer science). So applying much ahead of the graduation is not strictly necessary in my opinion.

Other positions are not (yet) advertised (e.g. the PI has some money and considers whether to pay for 2 PhDs or one postdoc etc). For those it is more important to be in some sort of exchange with people in the field: typically through conferences/workshops; but also 'boring' project meetings organized by funding agencies are good opportunities to network. Other ideas include: contributing useful software to the community, internships, giving talks at other universities when you are traveling, etc...

If you do some of this, you will not have difficulty finding a postdoc position. Your application will only be a formality, after everything else is already decided.

Also, why not have a break after the PhD? Traveling the world? Decide for yourself for some while what to do with your time?

I more often make the observation that people are pushed into starting earlier, rather than not having applied early enough.