I always thought PhD as being the main post grad research path if you wanted to get funded and that Msc was the way to get yourself ready for a PhD. I recently became aware that not all master causescourses are taught and some are research based too, so I am wondering whether itit's normal to do a research Msc (as opposed to a taught one) and if so, are there any advantages to this over just going for a PhD?

I always thought PhD as being the main post grad research path if you wanted to get funded and that Msc was the way to get yourself ready for a PhD. I recently became aware that not all master causes are taught and some are research based too so I am wondering whether it normal to do a research Msc (as opposed to a taught one) and if so, are there any advantages to this over just going for a PhD?

I always thought PhD as being the main post grad research path if you wanted to get funded and that Msc was the way to get yourself ready for a PhD. I recently became aware that not all master courses are taught and some are research based, so I am wondering whether it's normal to do a research Msc (as opposed to a taught one) and if so, are there any advantages to this over just going for a PhD?

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How does a research masters work?

I always thought PhD as being the main post grad research path if you wanted to get funded and that Msc was the way to get yourself ready for a PhD. I recently became aware that not all master causes are taught and some are research based too so I am wondering whether it normal to do a research Msc (as opposed to a taught one) and if so, are there any advantages to this over just going for a PhD?