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One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearingclearly in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. Your instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearing in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. Your instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearly in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. Your instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

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One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearing in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Or recognizingRecognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. YouYour instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearing in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Or recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. You instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearing in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. Your instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?

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One normal engineering course at my university had an unreasonable amount of work: each week we would have like 5 quizzes (1 labview quiz, 2 class quizzes, 1 computer lab quiz, 1 graded report). The course merging with another 4 courses (Electric Circuits - Differential Equations - Statistics - Chemistry) caused a lot of pressure.

The material of the engineering course, was overwhelming, incredibly lengthy in unreasonable amount of studying required.

Outside of the question of cheating---and you are clearing in the wrong there---this suggests that you may not have mastered the material from the previous courses to the level expected of you.

Engineering school is hard, but it is not impossible.

If you come out of this with the option to continue your studies (either at your current institution or elsewhere) you might want to consider either or both of ...

  1. Going back and re-doing some of the preceding material until you are deeply conversant with it and able to handle the concepts and calculation needed fluidly and without much difficulty. Just being sufficiently prepared will reduce the load from the subsequent course.

  2. Or recognizing that engineering is not for everyone and it might not be for you.

In any case, I'd like to remind you that the job you are studying toward is one where a mistake or a cut corner can have life-threatening consequences. You instructors are right to take this very seriously and you should too. Think carefully about this. Do you want that kind of risk hovering over your work?