2 Corrected capitalization. Added formatted links. Minor formatting
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It is interesting to see what Charles Darwin did in his scientific writing. Quoting from  

http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/3832According to Serendip Studio:

Darwin usually speaks in the first person plural when analyzing empirical evidence he has collected and only uses the first person singular when he is specifically speaking about his own actions, such as, "..many special facts which iI have collected," or when he is speaking about his own qualms, such as "I am well aware that there are on, on this view, many cases of difficulty, some of which I am trying to investigate." However, when analyzing his evidence, he always uses "we", such as "we notice", or "we understand"(2). Darwin's change in footing when he is explaining his theory places himself and the reader on the same level and makes him a more "humble" presenter, allowing us to suspend disbelief for at least the time being and trust him.

In other words - when heWhen Darwin is speaking as the scientist, he uses "we";"we", and when he is speaking as the human being, he uses "I""I". I really like that distinction.

I find the forced use of "we""we" when you mean "I""I" misplaced. It is important to sound as natural as possible in your writing - just look at Richard FeynmanRichard Feynman. You don't have to use convoluted language to win a Nobel prize. Clarity is king.

It is interesting to see what Charles Darwin did in his scientific writing. Quoting from http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/3832

Darwin usually speaks in the first person plural when analyzing empirical evidence he has collected and only uses the first person singular when he is specifically speaking about his own actions, such as, "..many special facts which i have collected," or when he is speaking about his own qualms, such as "I am well aware that there are on, on this view, many cases of difficulty, some of which I am trying to investigate." However, when analyzing his evidence, he always uses "we", such as "we notice", or "we understand"(2). Darwin's change in footing when he is explaining his theory places himself and the reader on the same level and makes him a more "humble" presenter, allowing us to suspend disbelief for at least the time being and trust him.

In other words - when he is speaking as the scientist, he uses "we"; when he is speaking as the human being, he uses "I". I really like that distinction.

I find the forced use of "we" when you mean "I" misplaced. It is important to sound as natural as possible in your writing - just look at Richard Feynman. You don't have to use convoluted language to win a Nobel prize. Clarity is king.

It is interesting to see what Charles Darwin did in his scientific writing. 

According to Serendip Studio:

Darwin usually speaks in the first person plural when analyzing empirical evidence he has collected and only uses the first person singular when he is specifically speaking about his own actions, such as, "..many special facts which I have collected," or when he is speaking about his own qualms, such as "I am well aware that there are on, on this view, many cases of difficulty, some of which I am trying to investigate." However, when analyzing his evidence, he always uses "we", such as "we notice", or "we understand"(2). Darwin's change in footing when he is explaining his theory places himself and the reader on the same level and makes him a more "humble" presenter, allowing us to suspend disbelief for at least the time being and trust him.

When Darwin is speaking as the scientist, he uses "we", and when he is speaking as the human being, he uses "I". I really like that distinction.

I find the forced use of "we" when you mean "I" misplaced. It is important to sound as natural as possible in your writing - just look at Richard Feynman. You don't have to use convoluted language to win a Nobel prize. Clarity is king.

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source | link

It is interesting to see what Charles Darwin did in his scientific writing. Quoting from http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/3832

Darwin usually speaks in the first person plural when analyzing empirical evidence he has collected and only uses the first person singular when he is specifically speaking about his own actions, such as, "..many special facts which i have collected," or when he is speaking about his own qualms, such as "I am well aware that there are on, on this view, many cases of difficulty, some of which I am trying to investigate." However, when analyzing his evidence, he always uses "we", such as "we notice", or "we understand"(2). Darwin's change in footing when he is explaining his theory places himself and the reader on the same level and makes him a more "humble" presenter, allowing us to suspend disbelief for at least the time being and trust him.

In other words - when he is speaking as the scientist, he uses "we"; when he is speaking as the human being, he uses "I". I really like that distinction.

I find the forced use of "we" when you mean "I" misplaced. It is important to sound as natural as possible in your writing - just look at Richard Feynman. You don't have to use convoluted language to win a Nobel prize. Clarity is king.