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From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet) and then takestake notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet) and then takes notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet) and then take notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

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From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet) and then takes notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet and then takes notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet) and then takes notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.

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From my (student) perspective, there is no such thing as slides that are good both for lecture and self-study. Slides for lecture should contain as little information as possible (following general good presentation rules). This will never be enough material for somebody who did not attend the lecture to learn (if you intend to provide such material).

For example, I had a professor, who made very good presentations. There was the concept of business requirements included in them (just the notion, with no definition, which is good for presentation). I spent 10 minutes arguing with my colleagues who did not attend the lecture that it does not mean only how much money you have to spend for project, but also the whole environment the project will be held in. If they studied without me they would be mislead. I knew what it was supposed to mean because I noted it down on slides copy.

That's when we come taking notes. My favourite workflow for lectures was when I could print the notes before the lecture (from Internet and then takes notes on them. This made me concentrate on the lecture very well, because I had to find the things that require additional notes in what the lecturer was saying, but I didn't have to note everything (I would not have time for this).

Remember that using slides makes yourself faster: you don't have to type notions/names/equations on the blackboard, while your students still have to do this. You must take this into consideration if you want them to have correct notes (and then learn all the facts properly).

If you already have the slides that include definitions, longer texts, you can make them more lecture-friendly fast, by making most important words/terms/ideas bold.