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I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits"“personality traits” which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence"“intelligence” (whatever that means to you) or "hard work"“hard work”. The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way.. Simply spending large amounts of time "working"“working” could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall (or seem to, at least), than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall (or seem to, at least), than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two “personality traits” which are more useful for researchers than “intelligence” (whatever that means to you) or “hard work”. The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time “working” could have no value I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall (or seem to, at least), than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

4 added 23 characters in body
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I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall (or seem to, at least), than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall, than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall (or seem to, at least), than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

3 deleted 6 characters in body
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I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall, than those (including myself) who are slightly less productive but may workdespite working longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall, than those (including myself) who are slightly less productive but may work longer hours.

I am of the opinion that there are two "personality traits" which are more useful for researchers than "intelligence" (whatever that means to you) or "hard work". The first is perseverance; the second is decisiveness. One must be willing to endure the ups and downs of research and the PhD life -- seeing boring projects to the end, doing the nitty-gritty coursework you may find tedious -- but one must also be willing to act quickly when a project is worth abandoning or removing oneself from; and must fully commit to any task will which take a substantial amount of time.

Thus, hard work is mostly useful if applied in a thoughtful, committed way. Simply spending large amounts of time "working" could have no value - I could spend an endless amount of time perfecting things which only incrementally improve my work. I'm a junior faculty at an R1 and feel my most productive colleagues work much more thoughtfully, and probably less time overall, than those (including myself) who are less productive despite working longer hours.

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