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Look, if she had done the same to the senior, there's something afoot.

Personally, I am uncomfortable with the length she is forcing you to go for her - like you've said, she wasn't present when you defended your thesis, and now, when there's an international acclaim in the game, she wants to have your work to present.

She is your advisor, which means she is not your mentor. There's an important difference between the two. Mentor is usually accredited professor. Advisor is usually a senior student, usually in a capacity of helping professor manage his workload, but rarely they are professor themselves.

You haven't cleared out if she is professor or not. If she is professor, then no, you got no recourse available for you, at least not at this point. But if she is a fellow student or just a person who specifically holds the title of 'advisor', and if there's a precedent - a bad one - then you can complain to the board of professors, but be aware you will have to have really good reasons and proofs at hand if things go south. In academic sphere that kind of thing can quickly go kaboom and influence your career later on in your life, never mind if you were right and she wrong.

So if you want to go that route, then save the emails, all the conversations, if you were talking over phone, write the dates down, etcetera. If it's an advanced level of research, what she is doing without asking for your input, it's an academic suicide at its finest - for her.

I find it strange she wants to present a topic she is (presumably) not well-versed in and you had to additionally practically dumb it down for her because she cannot be bothered to take some of her precious time and do her own note taking and research. Well, fine, she can present your thesis, but what about the questions that come after the presentation? If she doesn't understand the material and its nuances, she will trip all over herself because she won't know the particulars well enough to explain this or that facet of the experiments of wording or something else.

My condolences to her, because apparently her brains were eaten by zombies somewhere back in time. It would've been better if you were the one to go and present the entire thing, because you know it inside and out.

Look, if she had done the same to the senior, there's something afoot.

Personally, I am uncomfortable with the length she is forcing you to go for her - like you've said, she wasn't present when you defended your thesis, and now, when there's an international acclaim in the game, she wants to have your work to present.

She is your advisor, which means she is not your mentor. There's an important difference between the two. Mentor is usually accredited professor. Advisor is usually a senior student, usually in a capacity of helping professor manage his workload, but rarely they are professor themselves.

You haven't cleared out if she is professor or not. If she is professor, then no, you got no recourse available for you, at least not at this point. But if she is a fellow student or just a person who specifically holds the title of 'advisor', and if there's a precedent - a bad one - then you can complain to the board of professors, but be aware you will have to have really good reasons and proofs at hand if things go south. In academic sphere that kind of thing can quickly go kaboom and influence your career later on in your life, never mind if you were right and she wrong.

So if you want to go that route, then save the emails, all the conversations, if you were talking over phone, write the dates down, etcetera. If it's an advanced level of research, what she is doing without asking for your input, it's an academic suicide at its finest - for her.

I find it strange she wants to present a topic she is (presumably) not well-versed in and you had to additionally practically dumb it down for her because she cannot be bothered to take some of her precious time and do her own note taking and research. Well, fine, she can present your thesis, but what about the questions that come after the presentation? If she doesn't understand the material and its nuances, she will trip all over herself because she won't know the particulars well enough to explain this or that facet of the experiments of wording or something else.

My condolences to her, because apparently her brains were eaten by zombies somewhere back in time. It would've been better if you were the one to go and present the entire thing, because you know it inside and out.

Look, if she had done the same to the senior, there's something afoot.

Personally, I am uncomfortable with the length she is forcing you to go for her - like you've said, she wasn't present when you defended your thesis, and now, when there's an international acclaim in the game, she wants to have your work to present.

She is your advisor, which means she is not your mentor. There's an important difference between the two. Mentor is usually accredited professor. Advisor is usually a senior student, usually in a capacity of helping professor manage his workload, but rarely they are professor themselves.

You haven't cleared out if she is professor or not. If she is professor, then no, you got no recourse available for you, at least not at this point. But if she is a fellow student or just a person who specifically holds the title of 'advisor', and if there's a precedent - a bad one - then you can complain to the board of professors, but be aware you will have to have really good reasons and proofs at hand if things go south. In academic sphere that kind of thing can quickly go kaboom and influence your career later on in your life, never mind if you were right and she wrong.

So if you want to go that route, then save the emails, all the conversations, if you were talking over phone, write the dates down, etcetera. If it's an advanced level of research, what she is doing without asking for your input, it's an academic suicide at its finest - for her.

I find it strange she wants to present a topic she is (presumably) not well-versed in and you had to additionally practically dumb it down for her because she cannot be bothered to take some of her precious time and do her own note taking and research. Well, fine, she can present your thesis, but what about the questions that come after the presentation? If she doesn't understand the material and its nuances, she will trip all over herself because she won't know the particulars well enough to explain this or that facet of the experiments of wording or something else.

It would've been better if you were the one to go and present the entire thing, because you know it inside and out.

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Look, if she had done the same to the senior, there's something afoot.

Personally, I am uncomfortable with the length she is forcing you to go for her - like you've said, she wasn't present when you defended your thesis, and now, when there's an international acclaim in the game, she wants to have your work to present.

She is your advisor, which means she is not your mentor. There's an important difference between the two. Mentor is usually accredited professor. Advisor is usually a senior student, usually in a capacity of helping professor manage his workload, but rarely they are professor themselves.

You haven't cleared out if she is professor or not. If she is professor, then no, you got no recourse available for you, at least not at this point. But if she is a fellow student or just a person who specifically holds the title of 'advisor', and if there's a precedent - a bad one - then you can complain to the board of professors, but be aware you will have to have really good reasons and proofs at hand if things go south. In academic sphere that kind of thing can quickly go kaboom and influence your career later on in your life, never mind if you were right and she wrong.

So if you want to go that route, then save the emails, all the conversations, if you were talking over phone, write the dates down, etcetera. If it's an advanced level of research, what she is doing without asking for your input, it's an academic suicide at its finest - for her.

I find it strange she wants to present a topic she is (presumably) not well-versed in and you had to additionally practically dumb it down for her because she cannot be bothered to take some of her precious time and do her own note taking and research. Well, fine, she can present your thesis, but what about the questions that come after the presentation? If she doesn't understand the material and its nuances, she will trip all over herself because she won't know the particulars well enough to explain this or that facet of the experiments of wording or something else.

My condolences to her, because apparently her brains were eaten by zombies somewhere back in time. It would've been better if you were the one to go and present the entire thing, because you know it inside and out.