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There are two aspects of this and one of them is usually forgotten. The usual reason is that some parts of CS are dependent on knowing mathematics and how to use it. The answer of Boaty Mcboatface mentions some of them. But not all of CS is like that and those working, say, in Human Factors or UI development probably use the math they learned much less than those studying algorithms or encryption.

But the other aspect is also important. The study of CS is enhanced from knowing the way in which mathematicians think and work - the mathematical way of thinking - not just from having facts at your fingertips. Mathematicians tend to be analytical and precise, depending on clear statements and logical demonstration. This way of looking at problems and stating solutions is of use to a computer scientist.

But there are a lot of other things that are also important in CS, so a broad education is valued, not just a math background. After all, many of us try to solve problems for people, not just for others in our own field. So, while mathematics is often useful in helping to develop the how of some solution, it is less useful in knowing why some program should or should not be developed.


Good mathematicians are also very creative, though that quality is widely shared with people of other fields. But becoming good in mathematics takes some work. Both depth and breadth are needed.

There are two aspects of this and one of them is usually forgotten. The usual reason is that some parts of CS are dependent on knowing mathematics and how to use it. The answer of Boaty Mcboatface mentions some of them. But not all of CS is like that and those working, say, in Human Factors or UI development probably use the math they learned much less than those studying algorithms or encryption.

But the other aspect is also important. The study of CS is enhanced from knowing the way in which mathematicians think and work - the mathematical way of thinking - not just from having facts at your fingertips. Mathematicians tend to be analytical and precise, depending on clear statements and logical demonstration. This way of looking at problems and stating solutions is of use to a computer scientist.

But there are a lot of other things that are also important in CS, so a broad education is valued, not just a math background. After all, many of us try to solve problems for people, not just for others in our own field. So, while mathematics is often useful in helping to develop the how of some solution, it is less useful in knowing why some program should or should not be developed.

There are two aspects of this and one of them is usually forgotten. The usual reason is that some parts of CS are dependent on knowing mathematics and how to use it. The answer of Boaty Mcboatface mentions some of them. But not all of CS is like that and those working, say, in Human Factors or UI development probably use the math they learned much less than those studying algorithms or encryption.

But the other aspect is also important. The study of CS is enhanced from knowing the way in which mathematicians think and work - the mathematical way of thinking - not just from having facts at your fingertips. Mathematicians tend to be analytical and precise, depending on clear statements and logical demonstration. This way of looking at problems and stating solutions is of use to a computer scientist.

But there are a lot of other things that are also important in CS, so a broad education is valued, not just a math background. After all, many of us try to solve problems for people, not just for others in our own field. So, while mathematics is often useful in helping to develop the how of some solution, it is less useful in knowing why some program should or should not be developed.


Good mathematicians are also very creative, though that quality is widely shared with people of other fields. But becoming good in mathematics takes some work. Both depth and breadth are needed.

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There are two aspects of this and one of them is usually forgotten. The usual reason is that some parts of CS are dependent on knowing mathematics and how to use it. The answer of Boaty Mcboatface mentions some of them. But not all of CS is like that and those working, say, in Human Factors or UI development probably use the math they learned much less than those studying algorithms or encryption.

But the other aspect is also important. The study of CS is enhanced from knowing the way in which mathematicians think and work - the mathematical way of thinking - not just from having facts at your fingertips. Mathematicians tend to be analytical and precise, depending on clear statements and logical demonstration. This way of looking at problems and stating solutions is of use to a computer scientist.

But there are a lot of other things that are also important in CS, so a broad education is valued, not just a math background. After all, many of us try to solve problems for people, not just for others in our own field. So, while mathematics is often useful in helping to develop the how of some solution, it is less useful in knowing why some program should or should not be developed.