3 The poster is using the term public domain, which is a separate issue related to the copyright of the thesis, and is unlikely to apply here. Removed that term to focus on the key argument, which is correct.
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I am not a lawyer but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent iswas not inpublicly disclosed prior to the patent application. Such a public domaindisclosure constitutes "prior art".

If your paper was published by a journal it is, or your thesis was deposited in the public domain and predatesan online university repository, then relevant prior art was publicly disclosed, predating the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

I am not a lawyer but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent is not in the public domain.

If your paper was published by a journal it is in the public domain and predates the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

I am not a lawyer but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent was not publicly disclosed prior to the patent application. Such a public disclosure constitutes "prior art".

If your paper was published by a journal, or your thesis was deposited in an online university repository, then relevant prior art was publicly disclosed, predating the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

2 Removal of an unusual acronym
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IANALI am not a lawyer but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent is not in the public domain.

If your paper was published by a journal it is in the public domain and predates the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

IANAL but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent is not in the public domain.

If your paper was published by a journal it is in the public domain and predates the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

I am not a lawyer but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent is not in the public domain.

If your paper was published by a journal it is in the public domain and predates the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.

1
source | link

IANAL but this is my understanding of patent law...

Another consideration is that a patent is granted on the understanding that the object or idea covered by the patent is not in the public domain.

If your paper was published by a journal it is in the public domain and predates the patent application. As such the patent should not have been granted in the first place and would be unenforceable if push came to shove in a court. So your university (his employer... perhaps shotly to be his ex-employer) should have a very easy case to get the patent set aside. They will have the legal firepower available to do this, you won't be able to afford what they can afford to protect their reputation. Talk to your research organisation.

Even if the system in China rejects the complaint, the holders won't be able to register a patent anywhere else in the world for this substance / process and anywhere else in the world will be free to use the substance / process so it will seriously devalue the theft of your IP.