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The answers by @BenLinowitz and others are excellent. Again, having had a one-on-one discussion, any email answers now need to be short and somewhat curt.

To expand on that: Anything you say can and will be used against you. In these cases, I'm actually a bit more verbose than my department office recommends (they suggest "All grades are final", end-of-message). But I do keep in mind that whatever I write is prone to be taken to andan advisor or a dean and used as fodder to get them to overturn the grade somehow.

So I actually write those types of emails considering a possibly hostile administrator as part of the intended audience. To be maximally clear and transparent, I usually document the quantified ways in which the student was failing in the email (exact test scores, final exam, weighted total, etc.). For example, the fact you said this student was earning a 50% average pre-final, and then 35% on the final exam, should obviously end almost any question about whether the student should be retained atin the collegeprogram or not, and so I would include it in writing. This may be a bit sharp for the student -- but at this point your goal needs to be terminating the conversation.

The answers by @BenLinowitz and others are excellent. Again, having had a one-on-one discussion, any email answers now need to be short and somewhat curt.

To expand on that: Anything you say can and will be used against you. In these cases, I'm actually a bit more verbose than my department office recommends (they suggest "All grades are final", end-of-message). But I do keep in mind that whatever I write is prone to be taken to and advisor or a dean and used as fodder to get them to overturn the grade somehow.

So I actually write those types of emails considering a possibly hostile administrator as part of the intended audience. To be maximally clear and transparent, I usually document the quantified ways in which the student was failing in the email (exact test scores, final exam, weighted total, etc.). For example, the fact you said this student was earning a 50% average pre-final, and then 35% on the final exam, should obviously end almost any question about whether the student should be retained at the college or not, and so I would include it in writing. This may be a bit sharp for the student -- but at this point your goal needs to be terminating the conversation.

The answers by @BenLinowitz and others are excellent. Again, having had a one-on-one discussion, any email answers now need to be short and somewhat curt.

To expand on that: Anything you say can and will be used against you. In these cases, I'm actually a bit more verbose than my department office recommends (they suggest "All grades are final", end-of-message). But I do keep in mind that whatever I write is prone to be taken to an advisor or a dean and used as fodder to get them to overturn the grade somehow.

So I actually write those types of emails considering a possibly hostile administrator as part of the intended audience. To be maximally clear and transparent, I usually document the quantified ways in which the student was failing in the email (exact test scores, final exam, weighted total, etc.). For example, the fact you said this student was earning a 50% average pre-final, and then 35% on the final exam, should obviously end almost any question about whether the student should be retained in the program or not, and so I would include it in writing. This may be a bit sharp for the student -- but at this point your goal needs to be terminating the conversation.

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source | link

The answers by @BenLinowitz and others are excellent. Again, having had a one-on-one discussion, any email answers now need to be short and somewhat curt.

To expand on that: Anything you say can and will be used against you. In these cases, I'm actually a bit more verbose than my department office recommends (they suggest "All grades are final", end-of-message). But I do keep in mind that whatever I write is prone to be taken to and advisor or a dean and used as fodder to get them to overturn the grade somehow.

So I actually write those types of emails considering a possibly hostile administrator as part of the intended audience. To be maximally clear and transparent, I usually document the quantified ways in which the student was failing in the email (exact test scores, final exam, weighted total, etc.). For example, the fact you said this student was earning a 50% average pre-final, and then 35% on the final exam, should obviously end almost any question about whether the student should be retained at the college or not, and so I would include it in writing. This may be a bit sharp for the student -- but at this point your goal needs to be terminating the conversation.