2 Copy edited (e.g. ref. <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/thesis#Noun>).
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The type of work you described definitely belongs to the work of PhD students. And sometimes it can even be less connected to research, formresearch; from my own experience this can include organizing conferences or helping reorganization of offices.

The actual amount typically depends on the kind of contract. There are different types with different perks and requirements on your side. A typical full time university job ("Lehrstelle") includes a certain amount of teaching, typically measured by lecture hours. It is expected that you spend twice as much time for the teaching. I.e. if you have the obligation for 8 hours of teaching this will mean 16 hours per week. The additional time is required for preparation, correcting exams, supervising the lab, etc. Also supervising other (bachelor and master's) thesisestheses is expected, and also helping students in seminars.

Often these jobs are only part time, which means that the official teaching obligations are also only halved. This allows you to spend the other half of the time for doing research.

Additionally, there are research grants. They typically do not include teaching obligations, but supervising students for seminars and thesisestheses is often expected and also voluntarily giving a lecture. However, it is easier to select an interesting topic. With these contracts comes the most free time to actually do research work.

The other topics are normally not written down explicitly in contracts, but it is expected to to be the kind of work. If you feel that you do more than is usually done in your group, speak to your supervisor. From my experience in research groups that work well together, the work is shared belong all members, with a trend that PhD students that are shortly before finishing their own thesis have to do less work to concentrate on the at that time more pressing topic.

However, with any kind of contract it is often the case to write most of the thesis in after office hours.

The type of work you described definitely belongs to the work of PhD students. And sometimes can even be less connected to research, form my own experience this can include organizing conferences or helping reorganization of offices.

The actual amount typically depends on the kind of contract. There are different types with different perks and requirements on your side. A typical full time university job ("Lehrstelle") includes a certain amount of teaching, typically measured by lecture hours. It is expected that you spend twice as much time for the teaching. I.e. if you have the obligation for 8 hours of teaching this will mean 16 hours per week. The additional time is required for preparation, correcting exams, supervising the lab etc. Also supervising other (bachelor and master's) thesises is expected, and also helping students in seminars.

Often these jobs are only part time, which means that the official teaching obligations are also only halved. This allows you to spend the other half of the time for doing research.

Additionally, there are research grants. They typically do not include teaching obligations, but supervising students for seminars and thesises is often expected and also voluntarily giving a lecture. However, it is easier to select an interesting topic. With these contracts comes the most free time to actually do research work.

The other topics are normally not written down explicitly in contracts but it is expected to to the kind of work. If you feel that you do more than is usually done in your group, speak to your supervisor. From my experience in research groups that work well together, the work is shared belong all members, with a trend that PhD students that are shortly before finishing their own thesis have to do less work to concentrate on the at that time more pressing topic.

However, with any kind of contract it is often the case to write most of the thesis in after office hours.

The type of work you described definitely belongs to the work of PhD students. And sometimes it can even be less connected to research; from my own experience this can include organizing conferences or helping reorganization of offices.

The actual amount typically depends on the kind of contract. There are different types with different perks and requirements on your side. A typical full time university job ("Lehrstelle") includes a certain amount of teaching, typically measured by lecture hours. It is expected that you spend twice as much time for the teaching. I.e. if you have the obligation for 8 hours of teaching this will mean 16 hours per week. The additional time is required for preparation, correcting exams, supervising the lab, etc. Also supervising other (bachelor and master's) theses is expected, and also helping students in seminars.

Often these jobs are only part time, which means that the official teaching obligations are also only halved. This allows you to spend the other half of the time for doing research.

Additionally, there are research grants. They typically do not include teaching obligations, but supervising students for seminars and theses is often expected and also voluntarily giving a lecture. However, it is easier to select an interesting topic. With these contracts comes the most free time to actually do research work.

The other topics are normally not written down explicitly in contracts, but it is expected to be the kind of work. If you feel that you do more than is usually done in your group, speak to your supervisor. From my experience in research groups that work well together, the work is shared belong all members, with a trend that PhD students that are shortly before finishing their own thesis have to do less work to concentrate on the at that time more pressing topic.

However, with any kind of contract it is often the case to write most of the thesis in after office hours.

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source | link

The type of work you described definitely belongs to the work of PhD students. And sometimes can even be less connected to research, form my own experience this can include organizing conferences or helping reorganization of offices.

The actual amount typically depends on the kind of contract. There are different types with different perks and requirements on your side. A typical full time university job ("Lehrstelle") includes a certain amount of teaching, typically measured by lecture hours. It is expected that you spend twice as much time for the teaching. I.e. if you have the obligation for 8 hours of teaching this will mean 16 hours per week. The additional time is required for preparation, correcting exams, supervising the lab etc. Also supervising other (bachelor and master's) thesises is expected, and also helping students in seminars.

Often these jobs are only part time, which means that the official teaching obligations are also only halved. This allows you to spend the other half of the time for doing research.

Additionally, there are research grants. They typically do not include teaching obligations, but supervising students for seminars and thesises is often expected and also voluntarily giving a lecture. However, it is easier to select an interesting topic. With these contracts comes the most free time to actually do research work.

The other topics are normally not written down explicitly in contracts but it is expected to to the kind of work. If you feel that you do more than is usually done in your group, speak to your supervisor. From my experience in research groups that work well together, the work is shared belong all members, with a trend that PhD students that are shortly before finishing their own thesis have to do less work to concentrate on the at that time more pressing topic.

However, with any kind of contract it is often the case to write most of the thesis in after office hours.